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Thomas Zacharia named Director of Oak Ridge National Lab

Today UT-Battelle announced that Thomas Zacharia, who helped build Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a global supercomputing power, has been selected as the laboratory’s next director. “Thomas has a compelling vision for the future of ORNL that is directly aligned with the U.S. Department of Energy’s strategic priorities,” said Joe DiPietro, chair of the UT-Battelle Board of Governors and president of the University of Tennessee.

Jack Dongarra on ECP-funded Software Projects for Exascale

In this special guest post, Professor Jack Dongarra sits down with Mike Bernhardt from ECP to discuss the role of Dongarra’s team as they tackle several ECP-funded software development projects. “What we’re planning with ECP is to take the algorithms and the problems that are tackled with LAPACK and rearrange, rework, and reimplement the algorithms so they run efficiently across exascale-based systems.”

In Search Of: Radio Free HPC on the Hunt for the Aurora Supercomputer

In this podcast, Rich notes that recent reports on the Aurora supercomputer were incorrect. According to Rick Borchelt from the DoE: “On the record, Aurora contract is not cancelled.” Before that, we follow Henry on an unprecedented shopping spree at Best Buy.

ExaComm 2017 Workshop at ISC High Performance posts Full Agenda

The ExaComm 2017 Workshop at ISC High Performance has posted its Full Agenda. As the Third International Workshop on Communication Architectures for HPC, Big Data, Deep Learning and Clouds at Extreme Scale, the one day workshop takes place at the Frankfurt Marriott Hotel on Thursday, June 22. “The objectives of this workshop will be to share the experiences of the members of this community and to learn the opportunities and challenges in the design trends for exascale communication architectures.”

NYU Hosts Advanced Computing for Competitiveness Forum on April 13

The New York University Center for Urban Science and Progress will host the Advanced Computing for Competitiveness Forum on April 13. Sponsored by the U.S. Council on Competitiveness, the day-long event will look at why “To out-compete is to out-compute.” The Council’s landmark Advanced Computing Roundtable (ACR) – formerly the High Performance Computing (HPC) Initiative – is the preeminent forum for experts in advanced computing to set a national agenda on how such technologies should be leveraged for U.S. comptitiveness. Advanced computing includes technologies such as high performance computing, artificial intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT). ACR members represent industrial and commercial advanced computing users, hardware and software vendors and directors of academic and national laboratory advanced computing centers.”

Exascale Computing Project – Driving a HUGE Change in a Changing World

“In this keynote, Al Geist will discuss the need for future Department of Energy supercomputers to solve emerging data science and machine learning problems in addition to running traditional modeling and simulation applications. The ECP goals are intended to enable the delivery of capable exascale computers in 2022 and one early exascale system in 2021, which will foster a rich exascale ecosystem and work toward ensuring continued U.S. leadership in HPC. He will also share how the ECP plans to achieve these goals and the potential positive impacts for OFA.”

How GPU Hackathons Bring HPC to More Users

“GPUs potentially offer exceptionally high memory bandwidth and performance for a wide range of applications. The challenge in utilizing such accelerators has been the difficulty in programming them. Enter GPU Hackathons; Our mentors come from national laboratories, universities and vendors, and besides having extensive experience in programming GPUs, many of them develop the GPU-capable compilers and help define standards such as OpenACC and OpenMP.”

ADIOS 1.11 Middleware Moves I/O Framework from Research to Production

The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has announced the latest release of its Adaptable I/O System (ADIOS), a middleware that speeds up scientific simulations on parallel computing resources such as the laboratory’s Titan supercomputer by making input/output operations more efficient. “As we approach the exascale, there are many challenges for ADIOS and I/O in general,” said Scott Klasky, scientific data group leader in ORNL’s Computer Science and Mathematics Division. “We must reduce the amount of data being processed and program for new architectures. We also must make our I/O frameworks interoperable with one another, and version 1.11 is the first step in that direction.”

ORNL’s Al Geist to Keynote OpenFabrics Workshop in Austin

In his keynote, Mr. Geist will discuss the need for future Department of Energy supercomputers to solve emerging data science and machine learning problems in addition to running traditional modeling and simulation applications. In August 2016, the Exascale Computing Project (ECP) was approved to support a huge lift in the trajectory of U.S. High Performance Computing (HPC). The ECP goals are intended to enable the delivery of capable exascale computers in 2022 and one early exascale system in 2021, which will foster a rich exascale ecosystem and work toward ensuring continued U.S. leadership in HPC. He will also share how the ECP plans to achieve these goals and the potential positive impacts for OFA.

Oak Ridge steps up to Active Archive Solutions

Today the Active Archive Alliance announced that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has upgraded its active archive solutions to enhance the integrity and accessibility of its vast amount of data. The new solutions allow ORNL to meet its increasing data demands and enable fast file recall for its users. “These active archive upgrades were crucial to ensuring our users’ data is both accessible and fault-tolerant so they can continue performing high-priority research at our facilities,” said Jack Wells, director of science for the National Center for Computational Sciences at ORNL. “Our storage-intensive users have been very pleased with our new data storage capabilities.”