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Lori Diachin Named Deputy Director of Exascale Computing Project

The Department of Energy’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP) has named Lori Diachin as its new Deputy Director effective August 7, 2018. Lori replaces Stephen Lee who has retired from Los Alamos National Laboratory. “Lori has deep technical expertise, years of experience, and a collegial leadership style that qualify her uniquely for the ECP Deputy Director role,” said Bill Goldstein, director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and chairman of the ECP board of directors.

DOE Awards 1.5 billion Hours of Computing Time at Argonne

The ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge has awarded 20 projects for a total of 1.5 billion core-hours at Argonne to pursue challenging, high-risk, high-payoff simulations. “The Advanced Scientific Computing Program (ASCR), which manages some of the world’s most powerful supercomputing facilities, selects projects every year in areas directly related to the DOE mission for broadening the community of researchers capable of using leadership computing resources, and serving national interests for the advancement of scientific discovery, technological innovation, and economic competitiveness.”

ECP Launches ExaLearn Co-Design Center

The DOE’s Exascale Computing Project has initiated a new Co-Design Center called ExaLearn. Led by Principal Investigator Francis J. Alexander from Brookhaven National Laboratory, ExaLearn is a co-design center for Exascale Machine Learning (ML) Technologies. “Our multi-laboratory team is very excited to have the opportunity to tackle some of the most important challenges in machine learning at the exascale,” Alexander said. “There is, of course, already a considerable investment by the private sector in machine learning. However, there is still much more to be done in order to enable advances in very important scientific and national security work we do at the Department of Energy. I am very happy to lead this effort on behalf of our collaborative team.”

Davidovits and Middleton Share 2018 Howes Scholar in Computational Science Award

A theoretical plasma physicist and a computational biologist are co-winners of the 2018 Frederick A. Howes Scholar in Computational Science Award. “The honorees are Seth Davidovits, now a Department of Energy (DOE) Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Fellow at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Sarah Middleton, now with pharmaceutical maker GlaxoSmithKline.”

ARM goes Big: HPE Builds Petaflop Supercomputer for Sandia

Today HPE announced plans to deliver the world’s largest Arm supercomputer. As part of the Vanguard program, Astra, the new Arm-based system, will be used by the NNSA to run advanced modeling and simulation workloads for addressing areas such as national security, energy and science. “By introducing Arm processors with the HPE Apollo 70, a purpose-built HPC architecture, we are bringing powerful elements, like optimal memory performance and greater density, to supercomputers that existing technologies in the market cannot match,” said Mike Vildibill, vice president, Advanced Technologies Group, HPE.

Video: Announcing Summit – World’s Fastest Supercomputer with 200 Petaflops of Performance

Today Energy Secretary Rick Perry unveiled Summit, the world’s most powerful supercomputer. Powered by IBM POWER9 processors, 27,648 NVIDIA GPUs, and Mellanox InfiniBand, the Summit supercomputer is also the first Exaop AI system on the planet. “This massive machine, powered by 27,648 of our Volta GPUs, can perform more than three exaops, or three billion billion calculations per second,” writes Ian Buck on the NVIDIA blog. “That’s more than 100 times faster than Titan, previously the fastest U.S. supercomputer, completed just five years ago. And 95 percent of that computing power comes from GPUs.”

Podcast: Terri Quinn on Hardware and Integration at the Exacale Computing Project

In this podcast, Terri Quinn from LLNL provides an update on Hardware and Integration (HI) at the Exascale Computing Project. “The US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories will acquire, install, and operate the nation’s first exascale-class systems. ECP is responsible for assisting with applications and software and accelerating the research and development of critical commercial exascale system hardware. ECP’s Hardware and Integration research focus area (HI), was created to help the laboratories and the ECP teams achieve success through mutually beneficial collaborations.”

Video: Doug Kothe Looks Ahead at The Exascale Computing Project

In this video, Doug Kothe from ORNl provides an update on the Exascale Computing Project. “With respect to progress, marrying high-risk exploratory and high-return R&D with formal project management is a formidable challenge. In January, through what is called DOE’s Independent Project Review, or IPR, process, we learned that we can indeed meet that challenge in a way that allows us to drive hard with a sense of urgency and still deliver on the essential products and solutions. In short, we passed the review with flying colors—and what’s especially encouraging is that the feedback we received tells us what we can do to improve.”

Let’s Talk Exascale: Thom Dunning on Molecular Modeling with NWCHEMEX

In this edition of Let’s Talk Exascale, Thom Dunning from the University of Washington describes the software effort underway to for molecular modeling at exascale with NWCHEMEX. “To date, our work is focused on the redesign of Northwest Chem, but we’ve also explored a number of alternate strategies for implementing the overall redesign as well as the redesign of the algorithms, and this work required access to the ECP computing allocations.”

Earth-modeling System steps up to Exascale

“Unveiled today by the DOE, E3SM is a state-of-the-science modeling project that uses the world’s fastest computers to more accurately understand how Earth’s climate work and can evolve into the future. The goal: to support DOE’s mission to plan for robust, efficient, and cost-effective energy infrastructures now, and into the distant future.”