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Cray Shasta Software to Power Exascale Era

Today Cray a new, open and extensible software platform to address the growing need for supercomputing across government and private industries. As advanced simulation, artificial intelligence (AI) and digital transformation create new, data intensive workloads, the need for performance at scale is growing rapidly. Recognizing the challenges presented by the exascale era, Cray’s software fuses supercomputing performance and capability with the modularity, composability and ease-of-use of cloud computing.

Cray to Build El Capitan Exascale Supercomputer at LLNL

Today the Department of Energy announced that Cray will build the NNSA’s first exascale supercomputer, “El Capitan.” To be hosted at LLNL, El Capitan will have a peak performance of more than 1.5 exaflops and an anticipated delivery in late 2022. El Capitan will be DOE’s third exascale-class supercomputer, following Argonne National Laboratory’s “Aurora” and Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s “Frontier” system. All three DOE exascale supercomputers will be built by Cray utilizing their Shasta architecture, Slingshot interconnect and new software platform.

DOE Funds $37 Million for Materials and Chemistry Research in Quantum Information Science

Today the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $37 million in funding for targeted research in materials and chemistry to advance the important emerging field of Quantum Information Science (QIS). “America was a pioneer in the establishment of the Information Age,” said Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar. “It’s critical that we remain in the forefront of information science and technology, and this new research will help ensure continued U.S. leadership in the information economy in the years ahead.”

Video: Update on the Exascale Computing Project

In this video, ECP Director Doug Kothe provides an update on the Exascale Computing Project. ECP has mission to ensure that a capable exascale computing ecosystem will come to fruition with the arrival of the nation’s first exascale systems. “Enduring legacy translates to having dozens of application technologies that will be used to tackle some of the toughest problems in DOE and the nation, and so the applications are now going to be positioned to address their challenge problems and in many cases help solve them or be a part of the solution.”

AI Approach Points to Bright Future for Fusion Energy

Researchers are using Deep Learning techniques on DOE supercomputers to help develop fusion energy. “Unlike classical machine learning methods, FRNN—the first deep learning code applied to disruption prediction—can analyze data with many different variables such as the plasma current, temperature, and density. Using a combination of recurrent neural networks and convolutional neural networks, FRNN observes thousands of experimental runs called “shots,” both those that led to disruptions and those that did not, to determine which factors cause disruptions.”

Podcast: How Exascale Computing Could Help Boost Energy Production

In this podcast, Tom Evans, technical lead for ECP’s Energy Applications projects, shares about the motivations, progress, and aspirations on the path to the exascale. “Evans describes the unprecedented calculations expected at the exascale, the example of taking wind energy simulations much further, and the movement toward the use of more-general-purpose programming tools.”

HPC4Energy Innovation Program Funds Manufacturing Research

Today the High Performance Computing for Energy Innovation program (HPC4EI) announced the nine public/private projects awarded more than $2 million from the DOE, with aims of improving energy production, enhancing or developing new material properties and reducing energy usage in manufacturing. “We see increasing interest by both industry and the DOE Applied Energy Offices to leverage the world-class computational capabilities of leading national laboratories to address the significant challenges in improving the efficiency of our national energy footprint,” said HPC4EI Director Robin Miles.”

Panel Discussion: Exascale and Beyond – Challenges in Productive and Sustainable Software

In this video from PASC 2019, Lois Curfman McInnes from Argonne and Rich Brueckner from insideHPC moderate a panel discussion on the challenges of software development for exascale supercomputers. “Software—the key crosscutting technology by which teams collaborate toward predictive science—is dramatically increasing in complexity due to disruptive architectural changes, multiphysics and multiscale modeling, the coupling of simulations and data analytics, and the demand for greater reproducibility and sustainability.”

Harris and Riesselman Share 2019 Howes Scholar in Computational Science Award

Two scientists who use HPC for divergent purposes – astronomy and biology – are recipients of the 2019 Frederick A. Howes Scholar in Computational Science Award. The honorees are Chelsea Harris, a postdoctoral researcher in astronomy and astrophysics at Michigan State University, and Adam Riesselman, a machine-learning engineer at Insitro, a Bay Area drug-discovery company.

ORNL to lead INFUSE Network for Fusion Energy Program

The Department of Energy has established the Innovation Network for Fusion Energy program, or INFUSE, to encourage private-public research partnerships for overcoming challenges in fusion energy development. “Researchers and scientists in the Department of Energy are developing new tools to predict the performance, reliability and economics of fusion reactor concepts.”