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AMD Powers Corona Cluster for HPC Analytics at Livermore

Lawrence Livermore National Lab has deployed a 170-node HPC cluster from Penguin Computing. Based on AMD EPYC processors and Radeon Instinct GPUs, the new Corona cluster will be used to support the NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program in an unclassified site dedicated to partnerships with American industry. “Even as we do more of our computing on GPUs, many of our codes have serial aspects that need really good single core performance. That lines up well with AMD EPYC.”

DOE powers Aluminum and Steelmaking Research through HPC4Manufacturing Program

Today the HPC4Manufacturing Program announced four federal funding awards for solving key manufacturing challenges in steelmaking and aluminum production through supercomputing. “Primary metals industries are significant energy users, so opportunities to reduce energy consumption in this area is of great interest to our sponsors,” said HPC4Manufacturing Director Robin Miles of LLNL. “Additionally, this program is helping U.S. steel makers produce the higher strength steels vital to light weighting the next generation of automobiles.”

Spack – A Package Manager for HPC

Todd Gamblin from LLNL gave this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “Spack is a package manager for cluster users, developers and administrators. Rapidly gaining popularity in the HPC community, like other HPC package managers, Spack was designed to build packages from source. This talk will introduce some of the open infrastructure for distributing packages, challenges to providing binaries for a large package ecosystem and what we’re doing to address problems.”

Video: Sierra – Science Unleashed

Rob Neely from LLNL gave this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “This talk will give an overview of the Sierra supercomputer and some of the early science results it has enabled. Sierra is an IBM system harnessing the power of over 17,000 NVIDIA Volta GPUs recently deployed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is currently ranked as the #2 system on the Top500. Before being turned over for use in the classified mission, Sierra spent months in an “open science campaign” where we got an early glimpse at some of the truly game-changing science this system will unleash – selected results of which will be presented.”

Podcast Looks at Exascale Computing for Forefront Scientific Problems

In this edition of Let’s Talk Exascale, Fred Streitz of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory describes his team’s efforts to develop supercomputer applications that address forefront scientific problems by pushing the limits of leadership-class computing. “At SC18, Fred Streitz gave a talk in the US Department of Energy booth on the topic “Machine Learning and Predictive Simulation: HPC and the US Cancer Moonshot on Sierra.” As a guest on the ECP podcast, he provides an overview and some insights from his booth talk.”

DOE to Showcase World-Class Computational Science at SC18

Researchers and staff from 15 National Labs will showcase DOE’s latest computing and networking innovations and accomplishments at SC18 in Dallas next week. “Several of the talks and demos will highlight achievements by DOE’s Exascale Computing Program (ECP), a multi-lab, seven-year collaborative effort focused on accelerating the delivery of a capable exascale computing ecosystem by 2021.”

LLNL Unveils NNSA’s Sierra, World’s Third Fastest Supercomputer

Today LLNL unveiled Sierra, one of the world’s fastest supercomputers, at a dedication ceremony to celebrate the system’s completion. “The next frontier of supercomputing lies in artificial intelligence,” said John Kelly, senior vice president, Cognitive Solutions and IBM Research. “IBM’s decades-long partnership with LLNL has allowed us to build Sierra from the ground up with the unique design and architecture needed for applying AI to massive data sets. The tremendous insights researchers are seeing will only accelerate high performance computing for research and business.”

DOE Call for Proposals: HPC for Manufacturing and Materials

The DOE High Performance Computing for Energy Innovation (HPC4EI) Initiative plans to issue its first joint solicitation in November for manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) and materials (HPC4Mtls) research. “The programs are intended to spur the use of national lab supercomputing resources and expertise to advance innovation in energy-efficient manufacturing and in new materials that enable advanced energy technologies. Selected industry partners will be granted access to HPC facilities and experts at the national laboratories. Projects will be awarded up to $300,000 to support compute cycles and work performed by the national lab partners.”

New Paper Looks at Solidification of High-pressure Ice in newly discovered Ocean Worlds

A team of theorists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has solved a long-standing puzzle in the nucleation of a high-pressure phase of ice known as ice VII, which is believed to exist near the core of “ocean world” planets recently detected outside of the solar system, and has recently been discovered to exist within the Earth’s mantle. “By dissecting the thermodynamics and kinetics of interfaces, there are entirely new classes of problems that can be studied and, ultimately, controlled. A holy grail is to design self-regulating dynamic systems and machines that can utilize far-from-equilibrium dissipative dynamics to perform complex tasks, as in biological systems — control of nucleation is a step on this path.”

HPC4Materials Program Funds Nine Projects to Fight Hot Corrosion Degradation

The Department of Energy today announced the first round of awardees for the new HPC4Materials (HPC4Mtls) Program. “We are excited about adding a materials portfolio to the HPC4EnergyInnovation umbrella program,” said acting HPC4Materials Director Robin Miles. “Understanding material properties at the macro level based on atomic scale effects is a sweet spot for HPC capabilities. New materials are essential for improved energy efficiency in electrical power plants and advanced vehicles.”