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SC17 Exhibition Setting Records

Even though SC17 is still more than two months away, this year’s Exhibition is already setting records.

We are excited to report that we have already smashed the record for both net square feet of exhibit space sold as well as the total number of exhibitors,” says Bronis R. de Supinski, SC17 Exhibits Chair from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. “Whether industry or research – if you have anything to do with high performance computing, you need to have a presence at SC17. The SC exhibition floor is an exciting place to discover the latest innovations and make positive career-impacting connections.”

Job of the Week: Research Scientist at LLNL

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is seeking a Research Scientist in our Job of the Week. “For more than 60 years, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has applied science and technology to make the world a safer place. We have an opening for a research scientist with expertise in numerical or computational physics, astrophysics, or astronomy. The research will span topics in astronomical survey analysis, cosmology, optics modeling, and national security applications. This position is in the Physics Division/Applied Physics Section in the Optical Sciences group.”

HPC4Mfg Industry Day Comes to San Diego March 2-3

HPC4Mfg will host their first annual High Performance Computing for Manufacturing Industry Engagement Day on March 2-3 in San Diego. With a theme of “Spurring Innovation in U.S. Manufacturing Through Advanced Computing,” the conference will bring together representatives from U.S. manufacturing, national laboratories, universities, and consortiums to discuss the recent advancements in manufacturing realized through the application of HPC and how leveraging HPC expertise through public-private partnerships has lowered the risk of adoption.

Video: Livermore HPC Takes Aim at Cancer

In this video, Jonathan Allen from LLNL describes how Lawrence Livermore’s supercomputers are playing a crucial role in advancing cancer research and treatment. “A historic partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is applying the formidable computing resources at Livermore and other DOE national laboratories to advance cancer research and treatment. Announced in late 2015, the effort will help researchers and physicians better understand the complexity of cancer, choose the best treatment options for every patient, and reveal possible patterns hidden in vast patient and experimental data sets.”

Reflecting on the Goal and Baseline for Exascale Computing

Thomas Schulthess from CSCS gave this Invited Talk at SC16. “Experience with today’s platforms show that there can be an order of magnitude difference in performance within a given class of numerical methods – depending only on choice of architecture and implementation. This bears the questions on what our baseline is, over which the performance improvements of Exascale systems will be measured. Furthermore, how close will these Exascale systems bring us to deliver on application goals, such as kilometer scale global climate simulations or high-throughput quantum simulations for materials design? We will discuss specific examples from meteorology and materials science.”

Podcast: LLNL’s Lori Diachin Reviews the SC16 Technical Program

“I think the most important thing I’d like people to know about SC16 is that it is a great venue for bringing the entire community together, having these conversations about what we’re doing now, what the environment looks like now and what it’ll look like in five, ten fifteen years. The fact that so many people come to this conference allows you to really see a lot of diversity in the technologies being pursued, in the kinds of applications that are being pursued – from both the U.S. environment and also the international environment. I think that’s the most exciting thing that I think about when I think about supercomputing.”

RAID Inc. Steps up with ZFS on Lustre at SC16

In this video from SC16, Brad Merchant from RAID Inc. describes the company’s new Lustre ZFS Building Block. “RAID Inc. offers a suite of building block product families that can be purchased individually or in conjunction with other RAID products to solve customer’s needs in the most demanding data-storage environments. Each product is customized to address customer’s individual requirements of performance, reliability, scalability and price. Each product is put through extensive testing and a burn-in/staging process which ensures customers will receive a solution designed to function as specified in their unique environment.”

Exascale Computing Project Announces $48 Million to Establish Four Exascale Co-Design Centers

Today the Department of Energy’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP) today announced that it has selected four co-design centers as part of a 4 year, $48 million funding award. The first year is funded at $12 million, and is to be allocated evenly among the four award recipients. “By targeting common patterns of computation and communication, known as “application motifs”, we are confident that these ECP co-design centers will knock down key performance barriers and pave the way for applications to exploit all that capable exascale has to offer.”

DOE to Showcase Leadership in HPC at SC16

Researchers and staff from the U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories will showcase some of DOE’s best computing and networking innovations and techniques at SC16 in Salt Lake City. “Computational scientists working for various DOE laboratories have been in involved in the conference since its 1988 beginnings, and this year’s event is no different. Experts from 14 national laboratories will be sharing a booth featuring speakers, presentations, demonstrations, discussions and simulations.”

LLNL Collaboration to Improve Cancer Screening

Computer scientists at LLNL and Norwegian researchers are collaborating to apply high performance computing to the analysis of medical data to improve screening for cervical cancer. The team is developing a flexible, extendable model that incorporates new data such as other biomolecular markers, genetics and lifestyle factors to individualize risk assessment, according to Abdulla. “We want to identify the optimal interval for screening each patient.”