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Department of Energy to Showcase World-Leading Science at SC19

The DOE’s national laboratories will be showcased at SC19 next week in Denver, CO. “Computational scientists from DOE laboratories have been involved in the conference since it began in 1988 and this year’s event is no different. Experts from the 17 national laboratories will be sharing a booth featuring speakers, presentations, demonstrations, discussions, and simulations. DOE booth #925 will also feature a display of high performance computing artifacts from past, present and future systems. Lab experts will also contribute to the SC19 conference program by leading tutorials, presenting technical papers, speaking at workshops, leading birds-of-a-feather discussions, and sharing ideas in panel discussions.”

Arm HPC User Group Returns to Denver Nov. 18

The Arm HPC team invites you to our 5th Annual Arm HPC User Group (AHUG) session at SC19. The all-day event takes place on Monday, Nov. 18 at the Curtis Hotel in Denver. “We have a full day agenda of strategic partners and end-users from all regions of the world sharing their experiences, best practices, plans, ecosystem advances, and results on Arm-based platforms for HPC applications. The goal of this event is, as always, to candidly share and network among the growing number of users and sites that are deploying Arm for HPC and to highlight the work of the many leaders in this area.”

NNSA Explorations: ARM for Supercomputing

Howard Pritchard from LANL and Simon Hammond from Sandia gave this talk at the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing 2019. “Sandia National Laboratories has been an active partner in leveraging our Arm-based platform since its early design, and featuring it in the deployment of the world’s largest Arm-based supercomputer, is a strategic investment for the DOE and the industry as a whole as we race toward achieving exascale computing.”

LANL teams with Arm for Extreme-scale Computing

Los Alamos National Laboratory and Arm are teaming up to make efficient, workload-optimized processors tailored to the extreme-scale computing requirements of the Laboratory’s national-security mission. The collaboration addresses the challenges of connecting more and more processors as high performance computers become larger and more powerful. “This close collaboration with EMC3, is expected to start bearing performance results in near term systems as well some of our future systems in design,” said Gary Grider, division leader for HPC at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

LANL to Acquire Next-Gen D-Wave Quantum Computer with Lower Noise

Today D-Wave Systems announced that Los Alamos National Laboratory has signed a contract to upgrade to the company’s next-generation “Advantage” quantum system. Available in 2020, the Advantage platform will deliver significant performance gains and greater solution precision. “With the Advantage quantum system, we are building the first ever quantum computer designed to deliver business benefit.”

Epic HPC Road Trip leads to Gary Grider at Los Alamos

In this special guest feature, Dan Olds from OrionX continues his Epic HPC Road Trip series with a stop at LANL in new Mexico. “Our conversation started with the open question: where do you see HPC going? He’s not wild about the fact that today’s machines are still being designed for dense matrix type problems along the lines of LINPACK rather than the sparse matrix problems that are much more prevalent today.”

Podcast: Irene Qualters from LANL Shares Life Lessons on HPC and Diversity

In this Big Compute Podcast episode Gabriel Broner interviews Irene Qualters about her career and the evolution of HPC. “Some of the most profound advances that I have seen come from groups of people that have very different perspectives, very different ideas. We have to struggle to collectively bring our different disciplines on our world’s hardest problems, on the world’s most challenging problems.”

New HeSpaDDA Algorithm Distributes Parallel Workloads on LANL Supercomputers

Researchers at Los Alamos National Lab have developed new software to distribute computation more efficiently and across increasing numbers of supercomputer processors. This new decomposition approach for molecular dynamics simulation is called the heterogeneous spatial domain decomposition algorithm, or HeSpaDDA. “In a nutshell, the proposed algorithm will make use of a priori knowledge of the system setup. Specifically, the region which is computationally less expensive.”

Video: LANL Creates first Billion-atom Biomolecular Simulation

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model and will help researchers to better understand and develop cures for diseases like cancer. “It is important to understand DNA at this level of detail because we want to understand precisely how genes turn on and off,” said Karissa Sanbonmatsu, a structural biologist at Los Alamos. “Knowing how this happens could unlock the secrets to how many diseases occur.”

Video: A History of Los Alamos National Lab

Terry Wallace from Los Alamos National Lab gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “The Laboratory was established in 1943 as site Y of the Manhattan Project for a single purpose: to design and build an atomic bomb. It took just 27 months. The Los Alamos of today has a heightened focus on worker safety and security awareness, with the ever-present core values of intellectual freedom, scientific excellence, and national service. Outstanding science underpins the Laboratory’s past and its future.”