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Equus Rolls out G2660 2U 2xGPU Server for HPC & Ai

Today Equus Compute Solutions rolled out its new G2660 2U 2xGPU server, ideal for artificial intelligence and deep learning environments. This GPU platform offers higher performance, reduced rack space requirements, and lower power consumption compared with traditional CPU-centric server platforms. :Our customers have been asking for the flexibility to source GPUs in different ways on high performance servers,” said Lee Abrahamson, CTO of Equus Compute Solutions. “Our GPU servers, such as the G2660 server, are the ideal cost-optimized solutions for a wide range of applications and workloads. At the same time, these innovative platforms provide benefits of scale and volume, component standardization, ease of service logistics, and the means to avoid vendor lock-in.”

Video: Arm + Lustre in HPC

In this video from DDN booth at SC18, Brent Gorda from ARM presents: Arm + Lustre in HPC. At the show, DDN announced that its Whamcloud division is delivering professional support for Lustre clients on Arm architectures. With this support offering, organizations can confidently use Lustre in production environments, introduce new clients into existing Lustre infrastructures, and deploy Arm-based clusters of any size within test, development or production environments. As the use of Lustre continues to expand across HPC, artificial intelligence and data-intensive, performance-driven applications, the deployment of alternative architectures is on the rise.

Job of the Week: HPC Software Developer at the HDF Group

The good folks at the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) Group in Champaign, Illinois is seeking an HPC Software Developer in our Job of the Week. “The HDF Group provides a unique suite of technologies and supporting services that facilitate the management of large and complex data collections. Its mission is to develop, advance and support HD technologies and ensure long-term access to HDF data. HDF technologies are used in virtually every industry and scientific domain to meet mission critical data management needs.”

One Stop Systems Steps up GPU Servers for Ai and World’s First PCIe Gen 4 Cable Adapter

In this video from SC18, Jaan Mannik from One Stop Systems describes how the company’s high performance GPU system power HPC and Ai applications. At the show, the company also introduced HIB616-x16, the world’s first PCIe Gen 4 cable adapter. “The OSS booth will also feature a partner pavilion where several OSS partners will be represented, including NVIDIA, SkyScale, Western Digital, Liqid, One Convergence, Intel and Lenovo. OSS and its partners will showcase new products, services and solutions for high-performance computing, including GPU and flash storage expansion, composable infrastructure solutions, the latest EOS server, cloud computing, and the company’s recently introduced Thunderbolt eGPU product.”

Deconstructing the Complexities of the Data Pipeline for Connected Cars

A connected car can generate up to a gigabyte of data per day, and perhaps even more. Impressively, it is estimated that there are approximately 2 million connected cars on our roadways at this very moment. This means the storage demands can be up to 200 exabytes per day. IBM walks readers through the complexities of the data pipeline for connected cars, and how to address these challenges and storage questions. 

Video: Whamcloud – Lustre for HPC and Ai

In this video from DDN User Group at SC18, Robert Triendl describes how the company is building tomorrow’s Lustre file system technology for Exascale. “Long recognized as a staple technology for those with the most demanding data requirements, Lustre is deployed in thousands of data centers in healthcare, energy, manufacturing, financial services, academia, research and HPC labs, and consistently is selected by top 100 HPC sites as the file system of choice for the world’s fastest computers.”

How Quantum Corp. Wrangles Big Data for HPC, Ai, and Autonomous Cars

In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Jason Coari from Quantum Corp. describes how the company wrangles Big Data for HPC, Ai, and Autonomous Cars. “Scientists and analysts today need intelligent data management throughout the entire research workflow, from ingest to HPC processing to archive. With multi-tier storage from Quantum, teams can better harness their data and transform the world.”

DDN steps up with Professional Support for Lustre Clients on Arm Platforms

At SC18 in Dallas, DDN announced that its Whamcloud division is delivering professional support for Lustre clients on Arm architectures. With this support offering, organizations can confidently use Lustre in production environments, introduce new clients into existing Lustre infrastructures, and deploy Arm-based clusters of any size within test, development or production environments. As the use of Lustre continues to expand across HPC, artificial intelligence and data-intensive, performance-driven applications, the deployment of alternative architectures is on the rise.

Solving the Data Management Challenge of Autonomous Driving

The action of driving an automobile is destined to take a very different route in the coming years as autonomous cars become commonplace on our roadways. The notion of autonomous driving is both scary and exciting, pushing the boundaries of what we know. IBM takes a look at one of the most vexing technology challenges posed by autonomous vehicles: how to manage all the data used in artificial intelligence development.

HPC at the University of Michigan: A Multi‐Tenant, Multi‐Science Campus Service Provider

In this video from the DDN User Group at SC18 in Dallas, Brock Palen from the University of Michigan presents: HPC at the University of Michigan: A Multi‐Tenant, Multi‐Science Campus Service Provider. “Advanced Research Computing — Technology Services provides access to and support for advanced computing resources. ARC-TS facilitates new and more powerful approaches to research challenges in fields ranging from physics to linguistics, and from engineering to medicine.”