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Atos delivers Quantum Learning Machine to Japan

Today Atos announced that it has sold its Atos Quantum Learning Machine (QLM), the world’s highest-performing commercially available quantum simulator, through its APAC distributor Intelligent Wave Inc. (IWI), in Japan. This is the first QLM that Atos has sold in Japan. “The Atos Quantum Learning Machine enables businesses to develop and experiment with quantum processes and delivers superior simulation capabilities to speed innovation.”

Video: The Future of Quantum Computing with IBM

In this video, Dario Gil from IBM shares results from the IBM Quantum Challenge and describes how you can access and program quantum computers on the IBM Cloud today. “Those working in the Challenge joined all those who regularly make use of the 18 quantum computing systems that IBM has on the cloud, including the 10 open systems and the advanced machines available within the IBM Q Network. During the 96 hours of the Challenge, the total use of the 18 IBM Quantum systems on the IBM Cloud exceeded 1 billion circuits a day.”

ICHEC to develop quantum circuit simulation tools for Europe’s largest supercomputers

Today the Irish Centre for High-End Computing (ICHEC) announced that it is leading a novel quantum simulation project in collaboration with partners at the Leibniz Supercomputing centre (LRZ) to develop quantum simulation tools for Europe’s largest supercomputers. “While actual quantum computing is still some way off, the simulation tools we are creating will advance the necessary concepts and skill-sets for quantum programming,” said Dr Niall Moran, Principal Investigator and project leader of the PRACE WP8 QuantEx project at ICHEC. “This work is being conducted with world-class research teams across a number of Irish third-level institutions and will contribute to preparing Ireland for Quantum programming.”

Podcast: ColdQuanta Serves Up Some Bose-Einstein Condensate

“ColdQuanta is headed by an old pal of ours Bo Ewald and has just come out of stealth mode into the glaring spotlight of RadioFreeHPC. When you freeze a gas of Bosons at low density to near zero you start to get macroscopic access to microscopic quantum mechanical effects, which is a pretty big deal. With the quantum mechanics start, you can control it, change it, and get computations out of it. The secret sauce for ColdQuanta is served cold, all the way down into the micro-kelvins and kept very locally, which makes it easier to get your condensate.”

Video: Major Market Shifts in IT

Shahin Khan from OrionX gave this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “We will discuss the digital infrastructure of the future enterprise and the state of these trends. OrionX works with clients on the impact of Digital Transformation on them, their customers, and their messages. Generally, they want to track, in one place, trends like IoT, 5G, AI, Blockchain, and Quantum Computing. And they want to know what these trends mean, how they affect each other, and when they demand action, and how to formulate and execute an effective plan. If that describes you, we can help.”

Zapata Computing opens early access to Orquestra for quantum-enabled workflow

Today Zapata Computing announced an Early Access Program to Orquestra, its end-to-end platform for quantum-enabled workflows. Providing the most software- and hardware-interoperable, enterprise quantum toolset, Orquestra enables advanced technology, R&D and academic teams to accelerate quantum solutions for complex computational problems in optimization, machine learning and simulation across a variety of industries. “Orquestra is the only system for managing quantum workflows. By providing frictionless collaboration and rapid iteration, it helps Zapata and our entire community accelerate the discovery and development of near-term quantum algorithms and applications.”

Q-CTRL to Accelerate Quantum Technology Solutions for National Security Applications

Today quantum startup Q-CTRL announced a strategic investment by In-Q-Tel (IQT), the not-for-profit strategic investor that identifies innovative technology solutions to support the national security communities of the U.S. and its allies. “The company’s practice in quantum computing solves the Achilles heel of this new technology – hardware error and instability – by delivering a set of techniques that allow quantum computations to be executed with greater success.”

Using Magnetic Circuits for Energy Efficient Big Data Processing

Researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have found a way to make the new generation of smart computers more energy efficient. “Traditionally, silicon chips have formed the building blocks of the infrastructure that powers computers. But this research uses magnetic components instead of silicon and discovers new information about how the physics of the magnetic components can cut energy costs and requirements of training algorithms — neural networks that can think like humans and do things like recognize images and patterns.”

Intel and QuTech Demonstrate High-Fidelity ‘Hot’ Qubits for Practical Quantum Systems

Today Intel and QuTech published a paper in Nature demonstrating the successful control of “hot” qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum computing, at temperatures greater than 1 kelvin. “Our demonstration of hot qubits that can operate at higher temperatures while maintaining high fidelity paves the way to allow a variety of local qubit control options without impacting qubit performance.”

South Africa’s National Integrated Cyberinfrastructure System joins EMC3 Consortium

Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Efficient Mission Centric Computing Consortium (EMC3) recently welcomed its first international partner, the South African National Integrated Cyberinfrastructure System (NICIS). “We are pleased to collaborate with NICIS on experiences in deploying a scalable cool data storage tier. Sharing requirements, solutions and experiences on challenges in providing an efficient computing environment is an important part of EMC3,” said Gary Grider, division leader for High Performance Computing at Los Alamos.