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Swiss Conference & HPCXXL User Group Events Return to Lugano

The Swiss National Supercomputing Centre will host the 11th annual Swiss Conference and bi-annual HPCXXL Winter Meeting April 6-9 in Lugano, Switzerland. “Explore the domains and disciplines driving change and progress at an unprecedented pace and join us at the Swiss HPC Conference. Gather with fellow colleagues, a recognizable lineup of industry giants, startups, technology innovators and renowned subject matter experts to share insights on the tools, techniques and technologies that are bringing private and public research communities and interests together and inspiring entirely new possibilities.”

HPC User Forum to Explore AI-HPDA Use In Banking and Investment Firms

Today Hyperion Research announced high-profile speakers from major banking and investment firms will highlight the agenda at the next HPC User Forum. Thomas Thurston, CTO of WR Hambrecht Ventures, and Brad Spiers, executive director at JP Morgan Chase will deliver keynote talks at the event, which takes place March 30-April 1 in Princeton, New Jersey. “The HPC User Forum meeting will also feature talks by U.S. and international experts on exascale computing and architectures, massive-scale analytics, AI for cyber operations, cancer research, fusion energy, seismology, HPC for small businesses, cloud computing, and quantum computing, along with technical updates from HPC vendors.”

UK to establish Northern Intensive Computing Environment (NICE)

The N8 Centre of Excellence in Computationally Intensive Research, N8 CIR, has been awarded £3.1m from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Resources Council to establish a new Tier 2 computing facility in the north of England. This investment will be matched by £5.3m from the eight universities in the N8 Research Partnership which will fund operational costs and dedicated research software engineering support. “The new facility, known as the Northern Intensive Computing Environment or NICE, will be housed at Durham University and co-located with the existing STFC DiRAC Memory Intensive National Supercomputing Facility. NICE will be based on the same technology that is used in current world-leading supercomputers and will extend the capability of accelerated computing. The technology has been chosen to combine experimental, modelling and machine learning approaches and to bring these specialist communities together to address new research challenges.”

Exascale Computing Project Announces Staff Changes Within Software Technology Group

The US Department of Energy’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP) has announced the following staff changes within the Software Technology group. Lois Curfman McInnes from Argonne will replace Jonathan Carter as Deputy Director for Software Technology. Meanwhile Sherry Li is now team lead for Math Libraries. “We are fortunate to have such an incredibly seasoned, knowledgeable, and respected staff to help us lead the ECP efforts in bringing the nation’s first exascale computing software environment to fruition,” said Mike Heroux from Sandia National Labs.

Postdoc Symposium at Berkeley Lab Looks to Exascale for Modeling and Simulation

Twenty-two postdoctoral fellows from across the Computing Sciences Area shared the status of their current projects at the first CSA Postdoc Symposium, held January 30-31 at Berkeley Lab. Their presentations covered a broad range of research topics, including code optimization, machine/deep learning, network routing, modeling and simulation of complex scientific problems, exascale, and other next-generation computer architectures.

Podcast: Solving Multiphysics Problems at the Exascale Computing Project

In this Let’s Talk Exascale Podcast, Stuart Slattery and Damien Lebrun-Grandie from ORNL describe how they are readying algorithms for next-generation supercomputers at the Department of Energy. “The mathematical library development portfolio of the Software Technology (ST) research focus area of the ECP provides general tools to implement complex algorithms. These algorithms are designed to scale up for supercomputers so that ECP teams can then use them to accelerate the development and improve the performance of science applications on DOE high-performance computing architectures.”

Exascale in Europe

Europe has developed a strategy for exascale computing, through partnerships and collaboration of European HPC vendors, academic institutions and HPC centers. It aims to deliver exascale-class systems and place the continent in the top three powers for supercomputing and science and industry using HPC. “It is a major step forward for Europe to reach the next level of computing capacity; it will help us to advance in future-oriented technologies, like the Internet of Things (Iot), AI, robotics and data analytics.”

Compendium of articles published on Numerical Algorithms for HPC Science

The Royal Society Publishing has recently released a special compendium of articles based on a recent scientific discussion meeting with HPC Industry thought leaders. “This issue contains contributions from those who develop and implement numerical algorithms and software libraries – numerical analysts, computer scientists, and high-performance computing researchers – with those who use them in some of today’s most challenging applications.”

Interview: Exascale Computing Project Update for 2020

In this video, Exascale Computing Project Director Doug Kothe describes how disciplined and tailored project management led to very impressive results in what was likely the most comprehensive independent review of the project to date. “ECP’s products will be robust, production ready, and functional right out of the box; and ECP is driving the sharing of information through regular training not only with ECP participants but also the broader US high-performance computing community to lower barriers to using exascale systems and accelerated architectures in general.”

Podcast: Earth and Space Science for Exascale

In this podcast, Anshu Dubey of Argonne National Laboratory describes the Earth and Space Science application portfolio in the Exascale Computing Project (ECP). “By and large, these applications are solving partial differential equations, and so there is that generality,” Dubey said. “Most times, the range of scales is so huge that you cannot resolve every scale, so then you have to do something called subgrid models, which can be very boutique.”