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Podcast: Quantum Supremacy? Yes and No!

In this podcast, the RadioFreeHPC team discusses the Google/NASA paper, titled “Quantum Supremacy Using a Programmable Superconducting Processor”, that was published and then unpublished. “The tantalizing promise of quantum computers is that certain computational tasks might be executed exponentially faster on a quantum processor than on a classical processor. A fundamental challenge is to build a high-fidelity processor capable of running quantum algorithms in an exponentially large computational space.”

Dr. Steven Squyres from Cornell to Keynote SC19

Dr. Steven Squyres from Cornell University will keynote the SC19 conference in Denver. His talk will be entitled “Exploring the Solar System with the Power of Technology.” Steve Squyres’ research focuses on the robotic exploration of planetary surfaces, the history of water on Mars, geophysics and tectonics of icy satellites, tectonics of Venus, planetary gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy.

Aitken Supercomputer from HPE to Support NASA Moon Missions

A new HPE supercomputer at NASA’s Ames Research Center will run modeling and simulation workloads for lunar landings. The 3.69 Petaflop “Aitken” system is a custom-designed supercomputer that will support modeling and simulations of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) for the agency’s missions and Artemis program, a mission to land the next humans on the lunar South Pole region by 2024.

Video: Reliving the First Moon Landing with NVIDIA RTX real-time Ray Tracing

In this video, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin looks back at the first moon landing with help from a reenactment powered by NVIDIA RTX GPUs with real-time ray tracing technology. “The result: a beautiful, near-cinematic depiction of one of history’s great moments. That’s thanks to NVIDIA RTX GPUs, which allowed our demo team to create an interactive visualization that incorporates light in the way it actually works, giving the scene uncanny realism.”

Supercomputing Asteroid Impacts for Planetary Defenses

In support of NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office, researchers are creating 3-D models and using one of NASA’s most powerful supercomputers to produce simulations of hypothetical asteroid impact scenarios. “Asteroid impacts are one of the only natural disasters we can actually predict and then take action to protect people,” said Michael Aftosmis, an aerospace engineer who leads the ATAP blast wave and ground damage modeling work at NAS.

TACC Powers Climate Studies with GRACE Project

Researchers are using powerful supercomputers at TACC to process data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). “Intended to last just five years in orbit for a limited, experimental mission to measure small changes in the Earth’s gravitational fields, GRACE operated for more than 15 years and provided unprecedented insight into our global water resources, from more accurate measurements of polar ice loss to a better view of the ocean currents, and the rise in global sea levels.”

XSEDE Teams with Cal State for Advanced Computing Training

The need for more young people in STEM careers in a growing concern for the HPC community. Along these lines, more than 70 undergraduate and graduate students participated in the recent XSEDE/DIRECT-STEM training workshops at Cal State LA. “We instruct the students in scientific computing and data science,” said Paul Nerenberg, assistant professor of physics and biology and research advisor for the DIRECT-STEM program funded by NASA. “These are going to be core skills for them in their careers no matter what they do.”

NASA to Launch University of Pittsburgh Supercomputer into Space

A novel supercomputer developed by a University of Pittsburgh team is set to journey to the International Space Station on May 1. The supercomputer will serve as a research “sandbox” for space-based experiments on computing, sensing, image processing and machine learning. “It will be “one of the most powerful space-qualified computers ever made and flown,” said Alan George, department chair of the Swanson School of Engineering’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, who led Pitt researchers and graduate students on the project.”

Evolving NASA’s Data and Information Systems for Earth Science

Rahul Ramachandran from NASA gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “NASA’s Earth Science Division (ESD) missions help us to understand our planet’s interconnected systems, from a global scale down to minute processes. ESD delivers the technology, expertise and global observations that help us to map the myriad connections between our planet’s vital processes and the effects of ongoing natural and human-caused changes.”

Video: Suitability of Commercial Clouds for NASA’s HPC Applications

Bob Hood from InuTeq gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “NASA’s High-End Computing Capability Project is periodically asked if it could be more cost effective through the use of commercial cloud resources. To answer the question, HECC’s Application Performance and Productivity team undertook a performance and cost evaluation comparing three domains: two commercial cloud providers, Amazon and Penguin, and HECC’s in-house resources—the Pleiades and Electra systems.”