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Porting Scientific Research Codes to GPUs with CUDA Fortran

Josh Romero from NVIDIA gave this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “In this session, we intend to provide guidance and techniques for porting scientific research codes to NVIDIA GPUs using CUDA Fortran. The GPU porting effort of an incompressible fluid dynamics solver using the immersed boundary method will be described. Several examples from this program will be used to illustrate available features in CUDA Fortran, from simple directive-based programming using CUF kernels to lower level programming using CUDA kernels.”

RCR uses Simulation to Accelerate Racecar Development

Richard Childress Racing (RCR) is hoping to improve racing times through a multi-year partnership with ANSYS. RCR will use ANSYS Pervasive Engineering Simulation software to more accurately predict machine performance and enhance vehicle speed on the race track. “Using ANSYS Pervasive Engineering Simulation throughout the entire racecar lifecycle, RCR will race faster, safer and more aerodynamic vehicles.”

Unstructured-Grid CFD Algorithms at NASA on Volta GPUs

Eric Nielsen from NASA gave this talk at SC17 in Denver. “In the field of computational fluid dynamics, the Navier-Stokes equations are often solved using an unstructured-grid approach to accommodate geometric complexity. Furthermore, turbulent flows encountered in aerospace applications generally require highly anisotropic meshes, driving the need for implicit solution methodologies to efficiently solve the discrete equations. To prepare NASA Langley Research Center’s FUN3D CFD solver for the future HPC landscape, we port two representative kernels to NVIDIA Pascal and Volta GPUs and present performance comparisons with a common multi-core CPU benchmark.”

NEC Deploys Sator Supercomputer at ONERA in France

NEC has deployed a new supercomputer at the ONERA center in France to power aerospace research. Called SATOR, the 667 Teraflop machine features Intel Broadwell E5-2680v4 processors and the Intel Omni-Path interconnect. “According to NEC, ONERA plans to upgrade the machine to 1.14 Petaflops peak sometime later this year.”

Pointwise ISV is Finalist for Small Business of the Year

The Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce has named Pointwise a finalist for 2018 Small Business of the Year award. Pointwise, Inc. is solving the top problem facing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) today – reliably generating high-fidelity meshes. The company’s Pointwise software generates structured, unstructured, overset and hybrid meshes; interfaces with CFD solvers such as ANSYS FLUENT, STAR-CCM+, OpenFOAM, and SU2 as well as many neutral formats, such as CGNS; runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac, and has a scripting language, Glyph, that can automate CFD meshing.

Video: Inside the Award-Winning Stanford Living Heart Project

In this video, Staffan Hansson from AdvaniaDC chats with Wolfgang Gentzsch from The UberCloud about the award-winning Stanford Living Heart Project, how the partnership was so successful, and his thoughts on HPC in the cloud and what it means for the future of research. “The Stanford LHP project is simulating cardiac arrhythmia, which can be an undesirable and potentially lethal side effect of drugs.”

How Manufacturing will Leap Forward with Exascale Computing

In this special guest feature, Jeremy Thomas from Lawrence Livermore National Lab writes that exascale computing will be a vital boost to the U.S. manufacturing industry. “This is much bigger than any one company or any one industry. If you consider any industry, exascale is truly going to have a sizeable impact, and if a country like ours is going to be a leader in industrial design, engineering and manufacturing, we need exascale to keep the innovation edge.”

Parallel Applications Speed Up Manufacturing Product Development

The product design process has undergone a significant transformation with the availability of supercomputing power at traditional workstation prices. With over 100 threads available to an application in compact 2 socket servers, scalability of applications that are used as part of the product design and development process are just a keyboard away for a wide range of engineers.

Jonathan Poggie from Purdue Wins DoD Computing Award

Associate Professor Jonathan Poggie and his team from Purdue have received a large research grant from the U.S. Department of Defense for supercomputing resources. The award enables science and technology research that would not be possible without extraordinary computer resources. “Poggie is the principal investigator for a new U.S. Department of Defense high-performance computing modernization program beginning in October, entitled “Prediction of Hypersonic Laminar-Turbulent Transition through Direct Numerical Simulation.” The project is focused on making conventional hypersonic wind tunnels more useful for vehicle design by helping designers work through the noise and turbulence present in the tunnels and allowing them to more accurately interpret the results of the wind tunnel tests.”

Supercomputing Jet Noise for a Quieter World

Researchers at the University of Minnesota are using Argonne supercomputers to to look for new ways to reduce the noise produced by jet engines. Among the loudest sources of human-made noise that exist, jet engines can produce sound in excess of 130 decibels. “The University of Minnesota team developed a new method based on input-output analysis that can predict both the downstream noise and the sideline noise. While it was thought that the sideline noise was random, the input-output modes show coherent structure in the jet that is connected to the sideline noise, such that it can be predicted and controlled.”