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LUMI: the EuroHPC pre-exascale system of the North

The LUMI pre–exascale supercomputer will be the one of the most powerful and advanced computing systems on the planet at the time of its installation. The vast consortium of countries with an established tradition in scientific computing and strong national computing centers will be a key asset for the successful infrastructure. In this talk we will discuss the LUMI infrastructure and its great value and potential for the research community.”

Codeplay implements MKL-BLAS for NVIDIA GPUs using SYCL and DPC++

In this special guest feature, Rod Burns from Codeplay writes that the company has made significant contributions to enabling an open standard, cross-architecture interface for developers as part of the oneAPI industry initiative.  Software developers are looking more than ever at how they can accelerate their applications without having to write optimized processor specific code. […]

European SiPearl Startup Licenses Arm for First-Generation Microprocessor

Today SiPearl, the company that is designing the high-performance, low-power microprocessor for the European exascale supercomputer, has signed a major technological licensing agreement with Arm, the global semiconductor IP provider. The agreement will enable SiPearl to benefit from the high-performance, secure, and scalable next-generation Arm Neoverse platform, codenamed ‶Zeusʺ, as well as leverage the robust software and hardware Arm ecosystem.

South Africa’s National Integrated Cyberinfrastructure System joins EMC3 Consortium

Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Efficient Mission Centric Computing Consortium (EMC3) recently welcomed its first international partner, the South African National Integrated Cyberinfrastructure System (NICIS). “We are pleased to collaborate with NICIS on experiences in deploying a scalable cool data storage tier. Sharing requirements, solutions and experiences on challenges in providing an efficient computing environment is an important part of EMC3,” said Gary Grider, division leader for High Performance Computing at Los Alamos.

Video: Energy Efficient Computing using Dynamic Tuning

Lubomir Riha from IT4Innovations gave this talk as part of the POP HPC webinar series. “This webinar focused on tools designed to improve the energy-efficiency of HPC applications using a methodology of dynamic tuning of HPC applications, developed under the H2020 READEX project. The READEX methodology has been designed for exploiting the dynamic behaviour of software. At design time, different runtime situations (RTS) are detected and optimized system configurations are determined. RTSs with the same configuration are grouped into scenarios, forming the tuning model. At runtime, the tuning model is used to switch system configurations dynamically.”

Video: State of ARM-based HPC

In this video, Paul Isaacs from Linaro presents: State of ARM-based HPC. “This talk provides an overview of applications and infrastructure services successfully ported to Aarch64 and benefiting from scale. “With its debut on the TOP500, the 125,000-core Astra supercomputer at New Mexico’s Sandia Labs uses Cavium ThunderX2 chips to mark Arm’s entry into the petascale world. In Japan, the Fujitsu A64FX Arm-based CPU in the pending Fugaku supercomputer has been optimized to achieve high-level, real-world application performance, anticipating up to one hundred times the application execution performance of the K computer.”

The true cost of AI innovation

“As the world’s attention has shifted to climate change, the field of AI is beginning to take note of its carbon cost. Research done at the Allen Institute for AI by Roy Schwartz et al. raises the question of whether efficiency, alongside accuracy, should become an important factor in AI research, and suggests that AI scientists ought to deliberate if the massive computational power needed for expensive processing of models, colossal amounts of training data, or huge numbers of experiments is justified by the degree of improvement in accuracy.”

Fugaku Supercomputer joins fight against COVID-19

Today RIKEN in Japan announced that the partially finished Fugaku supercomputer will be made available for research projects aimed to combat COVID-19. The installation of the new supercomputer began in December 2019, and it is scheduled to go into full-fledged open use in 2021. “To combat the global pandemic of the COVID-19 virus, we will rapidly provide access to the capabilities of Fugaku, leapfrogging its preparation, to accelerate the scientific process of diagnosis, treatment, as well as general prevention of infection spread, to contribute to the early termination of the pandemic.”

Efficient AI Computing for the Planet

In this keynote talk from the 2020 HiPEAC conference, Alesssandro Cremonesi from STMicroelectronics describes how artificial intelligence (AI) is the central nervous system of an increasingly connected world. He sets out both the benefits and potential pitfalls of AI, before arguing that AI now has to move beyond performance to efficiency in order to be sustainable. “So far, AI developments have been focused on performances regardless of the computational power needed, reaching in some applications performances better than the human ones. Now it is time to focus on efficient computation.”

Video: Overview of the Fujitsu A64fx processor

This video from Coreteks provides an overview of the Fujitsu A64FX processor that will power the pending Fugaku supercomputer in Japan. “The A64FX is a many core CPU like AMD Epyc or Intel’s Xeons, but at the same time it behaves like a GPU in some workloads matching NVIDIA’s most powerful offering, Volta. Today we’ll look at how this chip operates, why it could challenge Intel, AMD, NVIDIA and cloud and hyperscalers and what it could mean for us PC enthusiasts.”