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Podcast: The Exascale Data and Visualization project at LANL

In this episode of Let’s Talk Exascale, Scott Gibson discusses the ECP Data and Visualization project with Jim Ahrens from Los Alamos National Lab. Ahrens is principal investigator for the Data and Visualization project, which is responsible for the storage and visualization aspects of the ECP and for helping its researchers understand, store, and curate scientific data.

Fighting Cancer with Deep Learning at Scale with the CANDLE Project

In this episode of Let’s Talk Exascale, Mike Bernhardt discusses the CANDLE project for cancer research with Rick Stevens from Argonne National Lab. The CANcer Distributed Learning Environment (CANDLE) is an ECP application development project targeting new computational methods for cancer treatment with precision medicine.

ECP Launches “Let’s Talk Exascale” Podcast

The DOE’s Exascale Computing Project has launched a new podcast channel. In this episode, Danny Perez from Los Alamos National Laboratory discusses The Exascale Atomistic Capability for Accuracy, Length, and Time (EXAALT) project. EXAALT specializes in molecular dynamics simulations of materials. “We hope you enjoy the podcast, and we welcome your ideas for future episodes.”

Report: Future Software and Data Ecosystem for Scientific Inquiry

“The tremendous progress that we’re making toward the achievement of exascale systems, both here in the United States and in the European Union and Asia, will be undermined unless we can create a shared distributed computing platform to manage the logistics of massive, multistage data workflows with their sources at the network edge. Backhauling these rivers of data to the supercomputing center or the commercial cloud will not be a viable option for many, if not most applications.”

The U.S. D.O.E. Exascale Computing Project – Goals and Challenges

Paul Messina from Argonne gave this Invited Talk at SC17. “Balancing evolution with innovation is challenging, especially since the ecosystem must be ready to support critical mission needs of DOE, other Federal agencies, and industry, when the first DOE exascale systems are delivered in 2021. The software ecosystem needs to evolve both to support new functionality demanded by applications and to use new hardware features efficiently. We are utilizing a co-design approach that uses over two dozen applications to guide the development of supporting software and R&D on hardware technologies as well as feedback from the latter to influence application development.

Apply now for Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing 2018

Computational scientists now have the opportunity to apply for the upcoming Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC). The event takes place from July 29-August 10, 2018 in greater Chicago. “With the challenges posed by the architecture and software environments of today’s most powerful supercomputers, and even greater complexity on the horizon from next-generation and exascale systems, there is a critical need for specialized, in-depth training for the computational scientists poised to facilitate breakthrough science and engineering using these amazing resources.”

Pagoda Project Rolls Out First Software Libraries for Exascale

The Pagoda Project—a three-year Exascale Computing Project software development program based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory—has successfully reached a major milestone: making its open source software libraries publicly available as of September 30, 2017. “Our job is to ensure that the exascale applications reach key performance parameters defined by the DOE,” said Baden.

Exascale to Enable Smart Cities

Over at Argonne, Charlie Catlett describes how the advent of Exascale computing will enable Smart Cities designed to improve the quality of life for urban dwellers. Catlett will moderate a panel discussion on Smart Cities at the SC17 Plenary session, which kicks off the conference on Monday, Nov. 13 in Denver.

How Manufacturing will Leap Forward with Exascale Computing

In this special guest feature, Jeremy Thomas from Lawrence Livermore National Lab writes that exascale computing will be a vital boost to the U.S. manufacturing industry. “This is much bigger than any one company or any one industry. If you consider any industry, exascale is truly going to have a sizeable impact, and if a country like ours is going to be a leader in industrial design, engineering and manufacturing, we need exascale to keep the innovation edge.”

Supercomputing Earthquakes in the Age of Exascale

Tomorrow’s exascale supercomputers will enable researchers to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail. “Simulations of high frequency earthquakes are more computationally demanding and will require exascale computers,” said David McCallen, who leads the ECP-supported effort. “Ultimately, we’d like to get to a much larger domain, higher frequency resolution and speed up our simulation time.”