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Lessons on Integrating and Utilizing 10 Million Cores: Experience of Sunway TaihuLight

Haohuan Fu gave this Invited Talk at SC17 in Denver. “The Sunway TaihuLight supercomputer is the world’s first system with a peak performance greater than 100 PFlops and a parallel scale of over 10 million cores. Different from other existing heterogeneous supercomputers, the system adopts its unique design strategies in both the architecture of its 260-core Shenwei CPU and its way of integrating 40,960 such CPUs as 40 powerful cabinets. This talk will first introduce and discuss design philosophy about the approach to integrate these 10 million cores, at both the processor and the system level.”

SC17 Invited Talk: Gordon Bell on the Rise of Scalable Systems

Gordon Bell gave this Invited Talk at SC17. “A globally recognized pioneer in the supercomputing world, Bell will be sharing his latest reflections and insights with his fellow scientists, engineers and researchers at SC17 in Denver. Bell will highlight the work of the winners of the ACM Gordon Bell Prize from the past 30 years. Presented by the ACM, the recipients’ achievements have chronicled the important innovations and transitions of high performance computing, including the rise of parallel computing, a computing architecture that breaks down problems into smaller ones that may be solved simultaneously.”

SDSC Earthquake Codes Used in 2017 Gordon Bell Prize Research

A Chinese team of researchers awarded this year’s prestigious Gordon Bell prize for simulating the devastating 1976 earthquake in Tangshan, China, used an open-source code developed by researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego and San Diego State University (SDSU) with support from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). “We congratulate the researchers for their impressive innovations porting our earthquake software code, and in turn for advancing the overall state of seismic research that will have far-reaching benefits around the world,” said Yifeng Cui, director of SDSC’s High Performance Geocomputing Laboratory, who along with SDSU Geological Sciences Professor Kim Olsen, Professor Emeritus Steven Day and researcher Daniel Roten developed the AWP-ODC code.

Gordon Bell Prize Finalists to Present their work at SC17

SC17 has announced the finalists for the Gordon Bell Prize in High Performance Computing. The $10,000 prize will be presented to the winner at the conference in Denver next month. “The Gordon Bell Prize recognizes the extraordinary progress made each year in the innovative application of parallel computing to challenges in science, engineering, and large-scale data analytics. Prizes may be awarded for peak performance or special achievements in scalability and time-to-solution on important science and engineering problems.”

Computing Pioneer Gordon Bell to Present at SC17

Computing Pioneer Gordon Bell will share insights and inspiration at SC17 in Denver. “We are honored to have the legendary Gordon Bell speak at SC17,” said Conference Chair Bernd Mohr, from Germany’s Jülich Supercomputing Centre. “The prize he established has helped foster the rapid adoption of new paradigms, given recognition for specialized hardware, as well as rewarded the winners’ tremendous efforts and creativity – especially in maximizing the application of the ever-increasing capabilities of parallel computing systems. It has been a beacon for discovery and making the ‘might be possible’ an actual reality.”

PASC17 to Feature Talk by Gordon Bell Prize Winner Haohuan Fu

“This talk reports efforts on refactoring and optimizing the climate and weather forecasting programs – CAM and WRF – on Sunway TaihuLight. To map the large code base to the millions of cores on the Sunway system, OpenACC-based refactoring was taken as the major approach, with source-to-source translator tools applied to exploit the most suitable parallelism for the CPE cluster and to fit the intermediate variable into the limited on-chip fast buffer.”

Reflecting on the Goal and Baseline for Exascale Computing

Thomas Schulthess from CSCS gave this Invited Talk at SC16. “Experience with today’s platforms show that there can be an order of magnitude difference in performance within a given class of numerical methods – depending only on choice of architecture and implementation. This bears the questions on what our baseline is, over which the performance improvements of Exascale systems will be measured. Furthermore, how close will these Exascale systems bring us to deliver on application goals, such as kilometer scale global climate simulations or high-throughput quantum simulations for materials design? We will discuss specific examples from meteorology and materials science.”

Podcast: LLNL’s Lori Diachin Reviews the SC16 Technical Program

“I think the most important thing I’d like people to know about SC16 is that it is a great venue for bringing the entire community together, having these conversations about what we’re doing now, what the environment looks like now and what it’ll look like in five, ten fifteen years. The fact that so many people come to this conference allows you to really see a lot of diversity in the technologies being pursued, in the kinds of applications that are being pursued – from both the U.S. environment and also the international environment. I think that’s the most exciting thing that I think about when I think about supercomputing.”

Full Rundown of SC16 Stats, World Records, and Awards

The numbers are in for SC16, the international supercomputing conference that wrapped up last week in Salt Lake City. The conference drew more than 11,100 registered attendees and featured a technical program spanning six days. “The SC16 Exhibition was the largest in the history of the conference, with 349 exhibitors from industry, academia and research organizations from around the world.”

Chinese Research Team Wins Gordon Bell Prize using #1 Sunway TaihuLight Supercomputer

A weather science team from China has won 2016 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for their research project, “10M-Core Scalable Fully-Implicit Solver for Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Dynamics.” The winning team presented a method for calculating atmospheric dynamics on the world’s fastest computer, the 93 Petaflop Sunway TaihuLight system. “On the road to the seamless weather-climate prediction, a major obstacle is the difficulty of dealing with various spatial and temporal scales. The atmosphere contains time-dependent multi-scale dynamics that support a variety of wave motions.”