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Team RACKLette from ETH Zurich steps up at the SC19 Student Cluster Competition

In this video from SC19, Thor Goebel and Emir Isman from ETH Zurich Team RACKLette describe their system configuration in the Student Cluster Competition. “We are a team of motivated students from ETH Zürich in Switzerland with various fields of interests around HPC. Together we work on optimizing and tuning computations on all the different levels down from the physical hardware up to algorithmic performance optimizations wherever possible.”

Data-centric Programming Helps ETH Zurich Team Win Gordon Bell Prize

Today ACM named a six-member team from ETH Zurich recipients of the 2019 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for their work on DaCe OMEN, a new framework for simulating the transport of electrical signals through nanoscale materials. “The ETH Zurich researchers simulated the 10,000-atom system 14 times faster than an earlier framework that was used for a 1,000- atom system. The DaCe OMEN code they developed for the simulation has been run on two top-6 hybrid supercomputers, reaching a sustained performance of 85.45 Pflop/s on 4,560 nodes of Summit (42.55% of the peak) in double precision, and 90.89 Pflop/s in mixed precision.”

AMD Delivers Best-in-Class HPC Performance at SC19

Today at SC19, AMD announced a set of new customer wins and new platforms supporting AMD EPYC processors and Radeon Instinct accelerators, as well as the release of ROCm 3.0 development environment. “HPC organizations are continuing to adopt the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processor and Radeon Instinct accelerators for more powerful and efficient supercomputing systems. The 2nd Gen EPYC processors provide twice the manufacturing application performance and up to 60% faster Life Sciences simulations than competing solutions, while the Radeon Instinct GPU accelerator provides up to 6.6 peak theoretical TFLOPS Double Precision performance for HPC workloads.”

PASC19 Evolves into an International Conference on Computational Science

In this video from PASC19, Torsten Hoefler from ETH Zurich describes how PASC19 has grown into an international conference with over 60 percent of attendees from outside Switzerland. After that, he describes a new groundbreaking programming model his team is developing that centers around the minimization of data movement for computation.

Video: Data-Centric Parallel Programming

In this slidecast, Torsten Hoefler from ETH Zurich presents: Data-Centric Parallel Programming. “To maintain performance portability in the future, it is imperative to decouple architecture-specific programming paradigms from the underlying scientific computations. We present the Stateful DataFlow multiGraph (SDFG), a data-centric intermediate representation that enables separating code definition from its optimization.”

Call for Papers: EuroMPI Conference in Zurich

The EuroMPI conference has issued its Call for Papers. The event takes place September 10-13 in Zurich, Switzerland. “The EuroMPI conference is since 1994 the preeminent meeting for users, developers and researchers to interact and discuss new developments and applications of message-passing parallel computing, in particular in and related to the Message Passing Interface (MPI). This includes parallel programming interfaces, libraries and langauges, architectures, networks, algorithms, tools, applications, and High Performance Computing with particular focus on quality, portability, performance and scalability.”

Supercomputing how Fish Save Energy Swimming in Schools

Over at CSCS, Simone Ulmer writes that researchers at ETH Zurich have clarified the previously unresolved question of whether fish save energy by swimming together in schools. They achieved this by simulating the complex physics on the supercomputer ‘Piz Daint’ and combining detailed flow simulations with a reinforcement learning algorithm for the first time. “In their simulations, they have not examined every aspect involved in the efficient swimming behavior of fish. However, it is clear that the developed algorithms and physics learned can be transferred into autonomously swimming or flying robots.”

Video: Weather and Climate Modeling at Convection-Resolving Resolution

David Leutwyler from ETH Zurich gave this talk at the 2017 Chaos Communication Congress. “The representation of thunderstorms (deep convection) and rain showers in climate models represents a major challenge, as this process is usually approximated with semi-empirical parameterizations due to the lack of appropriate computational resolution. Climate simulations using kilometer-scale horizontal resolution allow explicitly resolving deep convection and thus allow for an improved representation of the water cycle. We present a set of such simulations covering Europe and global computational domains.”

Interview: Dr. Christoph Schär on Escaping the Data Avalanche for Climate Modeling

“There are large efforts towards refining the horizontal resolution of climate models to O(1 km) with the intent to represent convective clouds explicitly rather than using semi-empirical parameterizations. This refinement would move the governing equations closer to first principles and is expected to reduce the uncertainties of climate models. However, the output volume of climate simulations would dramatically grow, and storing it for later analysis would likely become impractical, due to limited I/O bandwidth and mass-storage capacity. In this presentation we discuss possible solutions to this challenge.”

Panel Discussion: The Exascale Era

In this video from Switzerland HPC Conference, Rich Brueckner from insideHPC moderates a panel discussion on Exascale Computing. “The Exascale Computing Project in the USA is tasked with developing a set of advanced supercomputers with 50x better performance than today’s fastest machines on real applications. This panel discussion will look at the challenges, gaps, and probable pathways forward in this monumental endeavor.”

Panelists:

Gilad Shainer, HPC Advisory Council
Jeffrey Stuecheli, IBM
DK Panda, Ohio State University
Torsten Hoefler, ETH Zurich
Rich Graham, Mellanox