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Simulating nature with the new Microsoft Quantum Development Kit chemistry library

In this video, the Microsoft Quantum Team describes how Quantum computers have the potential to solve the world’s hardest computational problems and alter the economic, industrial, academic, and societal landscape. In just hours or days, a quantum computer can solve complex problems that would otherwise take billions of years to solve. “To unlock these potential applications, the Microsoft Quantum Development Kit includes a new chemistry library that allows chemists to simulate molecular interactions and explore quantum algorithms for real-world applications in the chemistry domain.”

Podcast: Quantum Network to Test Unhackable Communications

In this Big Brains podcast, David Awschalom describes how he’s helping to train a new generation of quantum engineers. “The behavior of these tiny pieces is unlike anything we see in our world,” Awschalom said. “If I pull a wagon, you know how it’s going to move. But at the atomic world, things don’t work that way. Wagons can go through walls; wagons can be entangled and share information that is hard to separate.”

Video: D‑Wave Rolls Out Leap, A Quantum Application Development Environment

Today D-Wave Systems announced the immediate availability of free, real-time access to the D‑Wave Leap Quantum Application Environment. Leap is the first cloud-based QAE providing real-time access to a live quantum computer. “The next frontier of quantum computing is quantum application development. While we continue to advance our industry-leading quantum technology, our goal with Leap is to ignite a new generation of developers who will explore, experiment, and ultimately build our quantum application future.”

SC18 Preview: “A Quantum Future of Computation” by Microsoft’s Matthias Troyer

SC18 is continuing its series of session previews this week with a look at an Invited Talk on Quantum Computing by Matthias Troyer from Microsoft Research. “Attempting to bring clarity to the fast growing field of quantum computing, I will describe the hardware and software architecture of quantum computers and discuss how they differ from conventional classical high performance computers. Based on this, I will attempt to dispel myths and hype surrounding the field and present a realistic assessment of the potential of these devices, and the specific application areas on which they are expected to have a large impact.”

Microsoft is Making Progress on Quantum Computing as a Service

Just one year after launch, Microsoft is touting their progress towards building Quantum Computing as a Service. “The Microsoft Quantum Development Kit is the fastest path to quantum development. Available for Linux, MacOS, and Windows, you now are just a few steps away from accessing local quantum simulators or in Azure.”

D-Wave Demonstrates First Large-Scale Quantum Simulation of Topological State of Matter

Today D-Wave Systems published a milestone study demonstrating a topological phase transition using its 2048-qubit annealing quantum computer. This complex quantum simulation of materials is a major step toward reducing the need for time-consuming and expensive physical research and development.

The Rigetti 128-qubit chip — What it means for quantum

Chad Rigetti writes that his company is building a 128-qubit quantum computer over the next 12 months. The company has already built the 128-qubit processing chip. If successful, it could be the world’s most powerful quantum computer and it could have the chance to outpace traditional supercomputers. “To drive practical use of quantum computing today, we must be able to scale and improve the performance of the chips and connect them to the electronics on which they run — which has proven to be one of the most challenging aspects of quantum computing.”

NSF STAQ Project to devise First Practical Quantum Computer

To accelerate the development of a practical quantum computer that will one day answer currently unsolvable research questions, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $15 million over five years to the multi-institution Software-Tailored Architecture for Quantum co-design (STAQ) project. “Developing the first practical quantum computer would be a major milestone. By bringing together experts who have outlined a path to a practical quantum computer and supporting its development, NSF is working to take the quantum revolution from theory to reality.”

Atos Quantum Learning Machine Comes to SURFsara in the Netherlands

Dutch researchers have a new opportunity to experiment with Quantum Computing with the new Atos Quantum Learning Machine at SURFsara. The Atos Quantum Learning Machine is a complete on-premise quantum simulation environment designed for quantum software developers to generate quantum algorithms. It is dedicated to the development of quantum software, training and experimentation. The Atos Quantum Learning Machine allows researchers, engineers and students to develop and experiment with quantum software.

Quantum Computing in China: Progress on a Superconducting Multi-Qubits System

Dr. Xiaobo Zhu from China’s University of Science and Technology gave this talk at the HPC User Forum in Tucson. “CAS-Alibaba Quantum Computing Laboratory introduces quantum technology into computing sciences, aiming to manufacture high-speed quantum computers, and propelling quantum revolution in the computing world. This research has resulted in a Quantum Computing Cloud powered by a quantum processor which includes 11 superconducting qubits. This superconducting quantum chip works at extreme temperatures as low as 10mk (or -273.14℃).”