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DARPA Grant to Foster Practical Quantum Computing with Rigetti

Today Rigetti Computing announced the company has been awarded up to $8.6 million from DARPA to develop a full-stack system with proven quantum advantage for solving real world problems. “We believe strongly in an integrated hardware and software approach, which is why we’re bringing together the scalable Rigetti chip architecture with the algorithm design and optimization techniques pioneered by the NASA-USRA team.”

New Paper: A novel error-correction scheme for quantum computers

By taking advantage of the infinite geometric space of a particular quantum system made up of bosons, the researchers, led by Dr Arne Grimsmo from the University of Sydney, have developed quantum error correction codes that should reduce the number of physical quantum switches, or qubits, required to scale up these machines to a useful size. “The beauty of these codes is they are ‘platform agnostic’ and can be developed to work with a wide range of quantum hardware systems,” Dr Grimsmo said.

UC Riverside to help develop scalable quantum computers

The University of California, Riverside, has won a University of California Multicampus-National Lab Collaborative Research and Training Award of $3.75 million that will allow the campus to focus on enabling scalable quantum computing. “The goal of this collaborative project is to establish a novel platform for quantum computing that is truly scalable up to many qubits,” said Boerge Hemmerling, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at UC Riverside and the lead principal investigator of the three-year project. “Current quantum computing technology is far away from experimentally controlling the large number of qubits required for fault-tolerant computing. This stands in large contrast to what has been achieved in conventional computer chips in classical computing.”

TensorFlow Quantum software combines quantum and classical machine learning

University of Waterloo students have teamed up with Google to develop software to accelerate machine learning using quantum science. The collaborative effort resulted in the creation of an open-source hybrid quantum-classical machine learning software platform, called TensorFlow Quantum. TensorFlow Quantum integrates Google’s Cirq and TensorFlow and will allow for the rapid prototyping, training, inference, and […]

Finnish researchers demonstrate how noise impacts quantum computing

A team of researchers from three Finnish institutions (CSC, Aalto University, and Abo Akademi University) and their collaborators from Boston University in the USA have for the first time demonstrated how the noise impacts a calculation in a systematic way. By varying the time over which the quantum property of the qubits is changed (from microseconds to milliseconds) and studying different numbers of coupled qubits in a D-Wave device, they were able to confirm a general principle of defect creation (meaning errors in the calculation). “According to this principle, a longer computing time should give a better result, but the researchers found that the noise negatively affects the results more if the time is longer. They explained this behavior by a mathematical model, which will be a useful tool for diagnosing future quantum annealing devices and to find the best ways to operate them.”

ISC 2020 Keynotes Focus on Shaping Tomorrow

Today ISC 2020 announced that Mattias Troyer and Thomas Sterling will be keynote speakers at the event. During his keynote, Troyer will describe the hardware and software architectures of quantum computers systems and discuss how they differ from classical HPC systems. Sterling’s closing address this year promises to be more wide-ranging than his usual retrospective, as he traces the intersection of long-term trends involving the diminishing prospects of Moore’s Law, the lengthening lifetimes systems, the consolidation of the HPC market, and the ascent of machine learning.”

Honeywell Ventures paves way for Quantum System from Zapata Computing

Today quantum startup Zapata Computing announced a strategic investment from Honeywell Ventures, the venture capital arm of Honeywell. The investment will fuel continued enhancements to Zapata Computing’s platform and increase its ability to support its global customers. Prior to today’s investment, Zapata Computing has been developing quantum solutions in a technical collaboration with Honeywell, which announced plans today to be releasing a powerful trapped-ion quantum computer within the next three months.

Q-CTRL Releases Control Tools for Improving Quantum Hardware Performance

Today quantum startup Q-CTRL announced the Beta release of its professional-grade BOULDER OPAL software tools for the quantum computing market. “BOULDER OPAL is an advanced Python-based toolkit for developers and R&D teams using quantum control in their hardware or theoretical research. Technology agnostic and delivered via the cloud, BOULDER OPAL enables building and outputting new error-robust logic operations for even the most complex quantum circuits. The result for users is greater performance from today’s quantum computing hardware.”

D-Wave Leap 2 Quantum Cloud Service is Built for Business

Today D-Wave Systems announced the immediate availability of Leap 2, the first quantum cloud service designed for developers and organizations to easily build and deploy real-world hybrid quantum applications with practical impact. “With Leap, we opened the door to real-time quantum access. With Leap 2, we’re giving developers and businesses the key to business applications. By delivering a hybrid offering, we’re removing many of the barriers related to complexity and problem size,” said Alan Baratz, CEO of D-Wave.

Intel Horse Ridge Chip Addresses Key Barriers to Quantum Scalability

At the International Solid-State Circuits Conference this week, Intel presented a research paper demonstrating the technical details and experimental results of its new Horse Ridge cryogenic quantum computing control chip. “Building fault-tolerant, commercial-scale quantum computers requires a scalable architecture for both qubits and control electronics. Horse Ridge is a highly integrated System-on-a-Chip (SoC) that provides an elegant solution to enable control of multiple qubits with high fidelity—a major milestone on the path to quantum practicality.”