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Quantum Computing: Its Principles, Capabilities and Challenges

Dr. Mark Mattingley-Scott from IBM gave this talk at the Swiss HPC Conference. “Quantum Computing is here, right now – and we are at the start of a new way of computing, which will impact us the way the revolution started by Shockley, Bardeen and Brattain did in 1947. In this talk I will introduce Quantum Computing, its principles, capabilities and challenges and provide you with the insight you need to decide how you should engage with this revolutionary technology.”

Quantum Computing – Timing is Everything

Steve Reinhardt from D-Wave Systems gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “Despite the incredible power of today’s supercomputers, there are many complex computing problems that can’t be addressed by conventional systems. While we are only at the beginning of this journey, quantum computing has the potential to help solve some of the most complex technical, scientific, national defense, and commercial problems that organizations face. We expect that quantum computing will lead to breakthroughs in science, engineering, modeling and simulation, healthcare, financial analysis, optimization, logistics, and national defense applications.”

Video: Quantum Computing and Quantum Supremacy at Google

John Martinis from Google presents: Quantum Computing and Quantum Supremacy. “The goal of the Google Quantum AI lab is to build a quantum computer that can be used to solve real-world problems. Our strategy is to explore near-term applications using systems that are forward compatible to a large-scale universal error-corrected quantum computer. In order for a quantum processor to be able to run algorithms beyond the scope of classical simulations, it requires not only a large number of qubits.”

Hyperion Research Posts Interactive Map of 765 U.S. HPC Sites

Today Hyperion Research launched an information-rich, interactive map of 765 HPC sites in the United States. “The mapped sites include government, academic and industrial HPC data centers, along with HPC vendors. This powerful tool can be used to identify the economic impact of HPC in a user-defined area (state, Congressional district, et al.) or for the United States as a whole, or to understand where HPC jobs are located, as well as who the Congressional district representatives are.”

Quantum Computing at NIST

Carl Williams from NIST gave this talk at the HPC User Forum in Tucson. “Quantum information science research at NIST explores ways to employ phenomena exclusive to the quantum world to measure, encode and process information for useful purposes, from powerful data encryption to computers that could solve problems intractable with classical computers.”

Atos Quantum Learning Machine can now simulate real Qubits

Researchers at the Atos Quantum Laboratory have successfully modeled ‘quantum noise’ and as a result, simulation is more realistic than ever before, and is closer to fulfilling researchers’ requirements. “We are thrilled by the remarkable progress that the Atos Quantum program has delivered as of today,” said Thierry Breton, Chairman and CEO of Atos.

IBM brings in Startups to Accelerate Quantum Computing

Over at the IBM blog, Jeff Welser writes that nearly 100 startups, venture capitalists, and industry thought leaders are gathering today at the first IBM Q Summit Silicon Valley event. “IBM Q Summit attendees are gathering to discuss what to expect over the next five years and what it means to be “quantum ready.” The discussion will inevitably also center on the emerging role of the quantum developer and what that means for future application development.”

A Primer on Quantum Computing… with Doughnuts!

Jessica Pointing from MIT gave this talk at the IBM Think conference. “Because atoms and subatomic particles behave in strange and complex ways, classical physics can not explain their quantum behavior. However, when the behavior is harnessed effectively, systems become far more powerful than classical computers… quantum powerful.”

Video: IBM Quantum Computing will be “Mainstream in Five Years”

Talia Gershon from the Thomas J. Watson Research Center gave this talk at the 2018 IBM Think conference. “There is a whole class of problems that are too difficult for even the largest and most powerful computers that exist today to solve. These exponential challenges include everything from simulating the complex interactions of atoms and molecules to optimizing supply chains. But quantum computers could enable us to solve these problems, unleashing untold opportunities for business.”

Whurley Keynotes SXSW: The Endless Impossibilities of Quantum Computing

William Hurley from Strangeworks gave this talk at SXSW 2018. “Quantum computing isn’t just a possibility, it’s an inevitable next step. During his Keynote, whurley discusses how it will forever change the computing landscape and potentially the balance of international power. Countries around the world are investing billions to become the first quantum superpower. When we say an emerging technology represents a “paradigm shift,” it’s often hyperbole. In the case of quantum computing, it’s an understatement.”