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ISC 2017 Names Erich Strohmaier and Yutong Lu as Conference Fellows

Today the ISC High Performance conference announced the appointment of Dr. Erich Strohmaier of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA, and Prof. Yutong Lu from the National Supercomputing Center in Guangzhou, China, as ISC Fellows. ISC Fellows are individuals who have made and continue to make important contributions to the advancement of high performance computing (HPC), the community and the ISC High Performance conference series.

Supercomputing More Efficient Paper Production with HPC4MFG

Industry is collaborating with researchers at LBNL to significantly reduce paper production costs and increase energy efficiencies. “The major purpose is to leverage our advanced simulation capabilities, high performance computing resources and industry paper press data to help develop integrated models to accurately simulate the water papering process.”

Lorena Barba Presents: Data Science for All

“In this new world, every citizen needs data science literacy. UC Berkeley is leading the way on broad curricular immersion with data science, and other universities will soon follow suit. The definitive data science curriculum has not been written, but the guiding principles are computational thinking, statistical inference, and making decisions based on data. “Bootcamp” courses don’t take this approach, focusing mostly on technical skills (programming, visualization, using packages). At many computer science departments, on the other hand, machine-learning courses with multiple pre-requisites are only accessible to majors. The key of Berkeley’s model is that it truly aims to be “Data Science for All.”

Greg Kurtzer of LBNL Launches SingularityWare, LLC

Over at the Singularity Blog, Greg Kurtzer writes that he has created a new organization, SingularityWare, LLC. In partnership with RStor, the new company will be dedicated to further developing Singularity, supporting the associated open source community and growing the project. “In addition to continuing my leadership of Singularity (and the new LLC), I will be maintaining my association with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, as a scientific advisor as well as continuing other efforts I am associated with (e.g. Warewulf and OpenHPC).”

Exascale Computing Project Selects Co-Design Center for Graph Analytics

The Exascale Computing Project (ECP) has selected its fifth Co-Design Center to focus on Graph Analytics — combinatorial (graph) kernels that play a crucial enabling role in many data analytic computing application areas as well as several ECP applications. Initially, the work will be a partnership among PNNL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Purdue University.

Panel Discussion: The Exascale Endeavor

Gilad Shainer moderated this panel discussion on Exascale Computing at the Stanford HPC Conference. “The creation of a capable exascale ecosystem will have profound effects on the lives of Americans, improving our nation’s national security, economic competitiveness, and scientific capabilities. The exponential increase of computation power enabled with exascale will fuel a vast range of breakthroughs and accelerate discoveries in national security, medicine, earth sciences and many other fields.”

Video: Singularity – Containers for Science, Reproducibility, and HPC

“Explore how Singularity liberates non-privileged users and host resources (such as interconnects, resource managers, file systems, accelerators …) allowing users to take full control to set-up and run in their native environments. This talk explores Singularity how it combines software packaging models with minimalistic containers to create very lightweight application bundles which can be simply executed and contained completely within their environment or be used to interact directly with the host file systems at native speeds. A Singularity application bundle can be as simple as containing a single binary application or as complicated as containing an entire workflow and is as flexible as you will need.”

Kathy Yelick Joins Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame

Kathy Yelick, the Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences at LBNL, has been named to the Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame for her leadership in science, technology and engineering. Twelve women, each representing a different field, were named as 2017 inductees. “According the organization’s announcement, Yelick is being recognized as “an international leader in computational sciences and a leading force in applying high performance computing to efforts to develop alternative energy sources and combat climate change. She is an advocate for diversity in computer science education and the use of computing to solve societal challenges.”

Agenda Posted for Next Week’s HPC Advisory Council Stanford Conference

“Over two days we’ll delve into a wide range of interests and best practices – in applications, tools and techniques and share new insights on the trends, technologies and collaborative partnerships that foster this robust ecosystem. Designed to be highly interactive, the open forum will feature industry notables in keynotes, technical sessions, workshops and tutorials. These highly regarded subject matter experts (SME’s) will share their works and wisdom covering everything from established HPC disciplines to emerging usage models from old-school architectures and breakthrough applications to pioneering research and provocative results. Plus a healthy smattering of conversation and controversy on endeavors in Exascale, Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and much much more!”

Supercomputing Sheds Light on Leaf Study

A new study led by a research scientist at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) highlights a literally shady practice in plant science that has in some cases underestimated plants’ rate of growth and photosynthesis, among other traits. “More standardized fieldwork, in parallel with new computational tools and theoretical work, will contribute to better global plant models,” Keenan said.