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Video: Deep Learning for Science

Prabhat from NERSC and Michael F. Wehner from LBNL gave this talk at the Intel HPC Developer Conference in Denver. “Deep Learning has revolutionized the fields of computer vision, speech recognition and control systems. Can Deep Learning (DL) work for scientific problems? This talk will explore a variety of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s applications that are currently benefiting from DL.”

Supercomputing How First Supernovae Altered Early Star Formation

Over at LBNL, Kathy Kincade writes that cosmologists are using supercomputers to study how heavy metals expelled from exploding supernovae helped the first stars in the universe regulate subsequent star formation. “In the early universe, the stars were massive and the radiation they emitted was very strong,” Chen explained. “So if you have this radiation before that star explodes and becomes a supernova, the radiation has already caused significant damage to the gas surrounding the star’s halo.”

SC17 Panel: Energy Efficiency Gains From Software

In this video from SC17 in Denver, Dan Reed moderates a panel discussion on HPC Software for Energy Efficiency. “This panel will explore what HPC software capabilities were most helpful over the past years in improving HPC system energy efficiency? It will then look forward; asking in what layers of the software stack should a priority be put on introducing energy-awareness; e.g., runtime, scheduling, applications? What is needed moving forward? Who is responsible for that forward momentum?”

Exascale Computing to Accelerate Clean Fusion Energy

In this special guest feature, Jon Bashor from LBNL writes that Exascale computing will accelerate the push toward clean fusion energy. “Turning this from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool depends critically on high-performance, high-fidelity modeling of complex processes that develop over a wide range of space and time scales.”

Video: Security in HPC Environments

“Modern HPC systems do some things very similar to ordinary IT computing, but they also have some significant differences. Two key security challenges are the notions that traditional security solutions often are not effective given the paramount priority of high-performance in HPC. In addition, the need to make some HPC environments as open as possible to enable broad scientific collaboration and interactive HPC also presents a challenge.”

Kathy Yelick to Keynote ACM Europe Conference

Kathy Yelick from LBNL will give the HPC keynote on Exascale computing at the upcoming ACM Europe Conference. With main themes centering on Cybersecurity and High Performance Computing, the event takes place Sept. 7-8 in Barcelona.

How Extreme Energy Jets Escape a Black Hole

Researchers are using XSEDE supercomputers to better understand the forces at work at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. The work could reveal how instabilities develop in extreme energy releases from black holes. “While nothing – not even light – can escape a black hole’s interior, the jets somehow manage to draw their energy from the black hole.”

When Neutron Stars and Black Holes Collide

Working with an international team, scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed new computer models to explore what happens when a black hole joins with a neutron star – the superdense remnant of an exploded star. “If we can follow up LIGO detections with telescopes and catch a radioactive glow, we may finally witness the birthplace of the heaviest elements in the universe,” he said. “That would answer one of the longest-standing questions in astrophysics.”

Cryo-EM Moves Forward with $9.3M NIH Award

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded $9.3 million to the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to support ongoing development of PHENIX, a software suite for solving three-dimensional macromolecular structures. “The impetus behind PHENIX is a desire to make the computational aspects of crystallography more automated, reducing human error and speeding solutions,” said PHENIX principal investigator Paul Adams, director of Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division.”

Supercomputers turn the clock back on Storms with “Hindcasting”

Researchers are using supercomputers at LBNL to determine how global climate change has affected the severity of storms and resultant flooding. “The group used the publicly available model, which can be used to forecast future weather, to “hindcast” the conditions that led to the Sept. 9-16, 2013 flooding around Boulder, Colorado.”