Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Video: Readying Quantum Chromodynamics for Exascale

In this video, Fermilab scientist Andreas Kronfeld discusses the LatticeQCD project for Quantum Chromodynamics. As part of the Exascale Computing Project, LatticeQCD is increasing the precision of QCD calculations to understand the properties of quarks and gluons in the Standard Model of particle physics, a theory that clarifies the basic building blocks (or fundamental particles) of the universe and how they are related.

Video: The Exascale Computing Project and the Future of HPC

Doug Kothe from ORNL presented this ACM Tech Talk in April, 2019. “The ECP is designing the software infrastructure to enable the next generation of supercomputers—systems capable of more than 1018 operations per second—to effectively and efficiently run applications that address currently intractable problems of strategic importance. The ECP is creating and deploying an expanded and vertically integrated software stack on DOE HPC exascale and pre-exascale systems, thereby defining the enduring US exascale ecosystem.”

ExaLearn: The ECP Co-Design Center for Machine Learning

In this video from the HPC User Forum, Frank Alexander from Brookhaven National Laboratory presents: ExaLearn – ECP Co-Design Center for Machine Learning. “It is increasingly clear that advances in learning technologies have profound societal implications and that continued U.S. economic leadership requires a focused effort, both to increase the performance of those technologies and to expand their applications. Linking exascale computing and learning technologies represents a timely opportunity to address those goals.”

Exascale Computing Project Software Activities

Mike Heroux from Sandia National Labs gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “The Exascale Computing Project is accelerating delivery of a capable exascale computing ecosystem for breakthroughs in scientific discovery, energy assurance, economic competitiveness, and national security.The goal of the ECP Software Technology focus area is to develop a comprehensive and coherent software stack that will enable application developers to productively write highly parallel applications that can portably target diverse exascale architectures.”

Podcast: How the EZ Project is Providing Exascale with Lossy Compression for Scientific Data

In this podcast, Franck Cappello from Argonne describes EZ, an effort to effort to compress and reduce the enormous scientific data sets that some of the ECP applications are producing. “There are different approaches to solving the problem. One is called lossless compression, a data-reduction technique that doesn’t lose any information or introduce any noise. The drawback with lossless compression, however, is that user-entry floating-point values are very difficult to compress: the best effort reduces data by a factor of two. In contrast, ECP applications seek a data reduction factor of 10, 30, or even more.”

Podcast: Doug Kothe Looks back at the Exascale Computing Project Annual Meeting

In this podcast, Doug Kothe from the Exascale Computing Project describes the 2019 ECP Annual Meeting. “Key topics to be covered at the meeting are discussions of future systems, software stack plans, and interactions with facilities. Several parallel sessions are also planned throughout the meeting.”

Researchers Gear Up for Exascale at ECP Meeting in Houston

Scientists and Engineers at Berkeley Lab are busy preparing for Exascale supercomputing this week at the ECP Annual Meeting in Houston. With a full agenda running five days, LBL researchers will contribute Two Plenaries, Five Tutorials, 15 Breakouts and 20 Posters. “Sponsored by the Exascale Computing Project, the ECP Annual Meeting centers around the many technical accomplishments of our talented research teams, while providing a collaborative working forum that includes featured speakers, workshops, tutorials, and numerous planning and co-design meetings in support of integrated project understanding, team building and continued progress.”

Video: Ramping up for Exascale at the National Labs

In this video from the Exascale Computing Project, Dave Montoya from LANL describes the continuous software integration effort at DOE facilities where exascale computers will be located sometime in the next 3-4 years. “A key aspect of the Exascale Computing Project’s continuous integration activities is ensuring that the software in development for exascale can efficiently be deployed at the facilities and that it properly blends with the facilities’ many software components. As is commonly understood in the realm of high-performance computing, integration is very challenging: both the hardware and software are complex, with a huge amount of dependencies, and creating the associated essential healthy software ecosystem requires abundant testing.”

Podcast: Improving Parallel Applications with the TAU tool

In the podcast, Mike Bernhardt from ECP catches up with Sameer Shende to learn how the Performance Research Lab at the University of Oregon is helping to pave the way to Exascale. “Developers of parallel computing applications can well appreciate the Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) performance evaluation tool—it helps them optimize their efforts. Sameer has worked with the TAU software for nearly two and a half decades and has released more than 200 versions of it. Whatever your application looks like, there’s a good chance that TAU can support it and help you improve your performance.”

Video: Flying through the Universe with Supercomputing Power

In this video from SC18, Mike Bernhardt from the Exascale Computing Project talked with Salman Habib of Argonne National Laboratory about cosmological computer modeling and simulation. Habib explained that the ExaSky project is focused on developing a caliber of simulation that will use the coming exascale systems at maximal power. Clearly, there will be different types of exascale machines,” he said, “and so they [DOE] want a simulation code that can use not just one type of computer, but multiple types, and with equal efficiency.”