Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Dell Technologies HPC Community: Cancer Computer Founder Roy Chartier Talks HPC in Support of Cancer, COVID Research

Roy Chartier, founder and CTO of Cancer Computer, Ottawa, with more than 25 years in HPC, HPDA and AI, has assembled a team of  volunteers who support cancer researchers by connecting them with the computer hardware, processing capacity and IT support they need to save lives. During this pandemic year, the organizations has expanded its mission to support COVID-19 researchers. A member of the Dell Technologies HPC Community, Chartier in this interview talks about Cancer Computer’s work, its partnership with Dell and the value of cross-discipline meetings, such as those held organized by Dell for its HPC community members.

Applications Open for “Advancing Cancer Biology at the Frontiers of Machine Learning” Innovation Lab

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University, and Knowinnovation are convening experts in cancer systems biology, mathematical modeling and machine learning to come together, share ideas, form new collaborative teams, and propose and refine interdisciplinary pilot projects. The Innovation Lab “Advancing Cancer Biology at the Frontiers of Machine Learning and Mechanistic Modeling” will be held on June 1-5, 2020. 

BSC Powers Pan-Cancer Project

An international team has completed the most comprehensive study of whole cancer genomes to date, significantly improving our fundamental understanding of cancer and signposting new directions for its diagnosis and treatment. The Barcelona Supercomputing Centre has been involved from the initial stages of this project, and has contributed with the analysis of data, with the design of specific computing solutions for cancer genomics, as well as in the answering of specific questions related to with the biology of tumors.

Podcast: A Codebase for Deep Learning Supercomputers to Fight Cancer

In this Let’s Talk Exascale podcast, Gina Tourassi from ORNL describes how the CANDLE project is setting the stage to fight cancer with the power of Exascale computing. “Basically, as we are leveraging supercomputing and artificial intelligence to accelerate cancer research, we are also seeing how we can drive the next generation of supercomputing.”

XSEDE Supercomputers Advance Skin Cancer Research

In this TACC podcast, UC Berkeley scientists describe how they are using powerful supercomputers to uncover the mechanism that activates cell mutations found in about 50 percent of melanomas. “The study’s computational challenges involved molecular dynamics simulations that modeled the protein at the atomic level, determining the forces of every atom on every other atom for a system of about 200,000 atoms at time steps of two femtoseconds.”

Exascale CANDLE Project to Fight Against Cancer

The CANcer Distributed Learning Environment, or CANDLE, is a cross-cutting initiative of the Joint Design of Advanced Computing Solutions for Cancer collaboration and is supported by DOE’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP). CANDLE is building a scalable deep learning environment to run on DOE’s most powerful supercomputers. The goal is to have an easy-to-use environment that can take advantage of the full power of these systems to find the optimal deep-learning models for making predictions in cancer.

Ai allows for identification of new cancer genes

Researchers at the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre have created a new artificial intelligence-based computational method that accelerates the identification of new genes related to cancer. Prof. Pržulj highlights that this new method to analyze cells “enables the identification of perturbed genes in cancer that do not appear as perturbed in any data type alone. This discovery emphasizes the importance of integrative approaches to analyze biological data and paves the way towards comparative integrative analyzes of all cells.”

BSC fosters EUCANCan Project to share and reuse cancer genomic data worldwide

Today the Barcelona Supercomputing Center announced it will foster the EUCANCan project to allow both research and cancer treatments to be shared and re-used by the European and Canadian scientific community. As demonstrated by earlier work, research that merges and reanalyzes  biomedical data from different studies significantly increases the chances of new discoveries.

Supercomputing How Cancer Spreads through Superdiffusion

Over a the University of Texas at Austin, Marc Airhart writes that researchers are using TACC supercomputers to better understand the physics behind the spread of cancer. “Having a physicist working on cancer can provide a new perspective into how a tumor evolves,” said Abdul Malmi-Kakkada, a postdoctoral researcher who led the project, along with postdoctoral researcher Xin Li, and professor and chair of chemistry Dave Thirumalai. “And rather than only looking at genetics or biology, trying to attack the problem of cancer from different perspectives can hopefully lead to a better understanding.”

Fighting Cancer with Deep Learning at Scale with the CANDLE Project

In this episode of Let’s Talk Exascale, Mike Bernhardt discusses the CANDLE project for cancer research with Rick Stevens from Argonne National Lab. The CANcer Distributed Learning Environment (CANDLE) is an ECP application development project targeting new computational methods for cancer treatment with precision medicine.