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Supercomputing Cancer Data for Treatment Clues

In this video, researchers use TACC supercomputers in war against cancer. “Next-generation sequencing technology allows us to observe genomes and their activity in unprecedented detail,” he said. “It’s also making a lot of biomedical research increasingly computational, so it’s great to have a resource like TACC available to us.”

Supercomputing High Energy Cancer Treatments

Over at TACC, Aaron Dubrow writes that researchers are using TACC supercomputers to improve, plan, and understand the basic science of radiation therapy. “The science of calculating and assessing the radiation dose received by the human body is known as dosimetry – and here, as in many areas of science, advanced computing plays an important role.”

AI Technology from China Helps Radiologists Detect Lung Cancer

Today Infervision introduced its innovative, deep learning solution to help radiologists identify suspicious lesions and nodules in lung cancer patients faster than ever before. The Infervision AI platform is the world’s first to reshape the workflow of radiologists and it is already showing dramatic results at several top hospitals in China.

Turning AI Against Cancer at the Data Science Bowl

Today Booz Allen Hamilton and Kaggle today announced the winners of the third annual Data Science Bowl, a competition that harnesses the power of data science and crowdsourcing to tackle some of the world’s toughest problems. This year’s challenge brought together nearly 10,000 participants from across the world. Collectively they spent more than an estimated 150,000 hours and submitted nearly 18,000 algorithms—all aiming to help medical professionals detect lung cancer earlier and with better accuracy.

Podcast: Supercomputing Cancer Research and the Human Brain

In this WUOT podcast, Jack Wells from ORNL describes how the Titan supercomputer helps advance science. “The world’s third-most powerful supercomputer is located in Oak Ridge, and though it bears the imposing name TITAN, its goals and capabilities are more quotidian than dystopian. After that, WUOT’s Megan Jamerson tells us about a project at ORNL that uses TITAN to help humans digest vast sums of information from medical reports. If successful, the project could create new understandings about the demographics of cancer.”

Video: Livermore HPC Takes Aim at Cancer

In this video, Jonathan Allen from LLNL describes how Lawrence Livermore’s supercomputers are playing a crucial role in advancing cancer research and treatment. “A historic partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is applying the formidable computing resources at Livermore and other DOE national laboratories to advance cancer research and treatment. Announced in late 2015, the effort will help researchers and physicians better understand the complexity of cancer, choose the best treatment options for every patient, and reveal possible patterns hidden in vast patient and experimental data sets.”

Supercomputing the Cancer Moonshot and Beyond

In this video, Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov from the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration presents: Supercomputing the Cancer Moonshot and Beyond. “How can the next generation of supercomputers unlock biomedical mysteries that will shape the future practice of medicine? Scientists behind the National Strategic Computing Initiative, a federal strategy for investing in high-performance computing, are exploring this question.”

Supercomputing Cancer Diagnostics with CyVerse

Adam Buntzman and his colleagues at the University of Arizona recently developed a tool that uses CyVerse supercomputing resources to create the first nearly comprehensive map of the human immunome, all the possible immune receptors our bodies can make. “When people go to a clinic, it’s usually because they’re already sick,” Buntzman said. “If doctors could detect cancerous cells before they grow drastically out of proportion to healthy cells, patients would have much higher odds of successful cancer treatment and survival.”

LLNL Collaboration to Improve Cancer Screening

Computer scientists at LLNL and Norwegian researchers are collaborating to apply high performance computing to the analysis of medical data to improve screening for cervical cancer. The team is developing a flexible, extendable model that incorporates new data such as other biomolecular markers, genetics and lifestyle factors to individualize risk assessment, according to Abdulla. “We want to identify the optimal interval for screening each patient.”

Video: Storage Architecture for Innovation & Research at the University of Florida

In this video from the DDN booth at SC15, Dr. Erik Deumens of the University of Florida describes why unpredictable and less standard architectures and system configurations are necessary to meet the agility, availability and responsiveness requirements to meet the mission of innovation and exploration. “The University of Florida’s Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research (ICBR) offers access to cutting-edge technologies designed to enable university faculty, staff and students, as well as research and commercial partners worldwide with the tools and resources needed to advance scientific research.”