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Video: Supercomputing Dynamic Earthquake Ruptures

Researchers are using XSEDE supercomputers to model multi-fault earthquakes in the Brawley fault zone, which links the San Andreas and Imperial faults in Southern California. Their work could predict the behavior of earthquakes that could potentially affect millions of people’s lives and property. “Basically, we generate a virtual world where we create different types of earthquakes. That helps us understand how earthquakes in the real world are happening.”

Seeking Nominations for the XSEDE Advisory Board

XSEDE seeks nominations for individuals to serve on the XSEDE Advisory Board (XAB). “The XAB aims to ensure that XSEDE is designed to impact a broad range of disciplines, enable both research and education, have broader impacts to society, and have a user community that is diverse (gender, ethnic background, etc.). All members of the community are eligible to serve on the XAB. Individuals can nominate themselves or nominate another person as a potential XAB member.”

XSEDE Teams with Cal State for Advanced Computing Training

The need for more young people in STEM careers in a growing concern for the HPC community. Along these lines, more than 70 undergraduate and graduate students participated in the recent XSEDE/DIRECT-STEM training workshops at Cal State LA. “We instruct the students in scientific computing and data science,” said Paul Nerenberg, assistant professor of physics and biology and research advisor for the DIRECT-STEM program funded by NASA. “These are going to be core skills for them in their careers no matter what they do.”

Pitt Researchers using HPC to turn CO2 into Useful Products

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh are using XSEDE supercomputing resources to develop new materials that can capture carbon dioxide and turn it into a commercially useful substances. With global climate change resulting from increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere, the work could lead to a lasting impact on our environment. “The basic idea here is that we are looking to improve the overall energetics of CO2 capture and conversion to some useful material, as opposed to putting it in the ground and just storing it someplace,” said Karl Johnson from the University of Pittsburgh. “But capture and conversion are typically different processes.”

Dr Debora Sijacki wins 2019 PRACE Ada Lovelace Award for HPC

Today the European PRACE initiative announced that Dr Debora Sijacki from the University of Cambridge will receive the 2019 PRACE Ada Lovelace Award for HPC for her outstanding contributions to and impact on high performance computing in Europe. As a computational cosmologist she has achieved numerous high-impact results in astrophysics based on numerical simulations on state-of-the-art supercomputers.

Podcast: Supercomputing Synthetic Biomolecules

Researchers are using HPC to design potentially life-saving proteins. In this TACC podcast, host Jorge Salazar discusses this groundbreaking work with the science team. “The scientists say their methods could be applied to useful technologies such as pharmaceutical targeting, artificial energy harvesting, ‘smart’ sensing and building materials, and more.”

XSEDE teams with Aristotle Cloud Federation to implement clouds on U.S. campuses

Two NSF-funded projects have joined forces to help university systems administrators implement cloud computing systems on their campuses. “Combining the consulting strengths of the XSEDE Cyberinfrastructure Resource Integration (CRI) group with Aristotle Cloud Federation project expertise in OpenStack cloud implementation is a win-win for U.S. campus cyberinfrastructure administrators interested in adding clouds to their campus research resources,” said John Towns, principal investigator and project director for XSEDE.”

Supercomputing Neutron Star Structures and Mergers

Over at XSEDE, Kimberly Mann Bruch & Jan Zverina from the San Diego Supercomputer Center write that researchers are using supercomputers to create detailed simulations of neutron star structures and mergers to better understand gravitational waves, which were detected for the first time in 2015. “XSEDE resources significantly accelerated our scientific output,” noted Paschalidis, whose group has been using XSEDE for well over a decade, when they were students or post-doctoral researchers. “If I were to put a number on it, I would say that using XSEDE accelerated our research by a factor of three or more, compared to using local resources alone.”

Supercomputing Sea Fog Development to Prevent Maritime Disasters

Over at the XSEDE blog, Kim Bruch from SDSC writes that an international team of researchers is using supercomputers to shed new light on how and why a particular type of sea fog forms. Through for simulation, they hope to provide more accurate fog predictions that help reduce the number of maritime mishaps. “The researchers have been using the Comet supercomputer based at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego. To-date, the team has used about 2 million core hours.”

XSEDE allocates $7.3M worth of computing time to U.S. Researchers

“XSEDE has awarded 145 deserving research teams at 109 universities and other institutions access to nearly two dozen NSF-funded computational and storage resources, as well as other services unique to XSEDE, such as the Extended Collaborative Support Services (ECSS). Total allocations this cycle, running July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, represent an estimated $7.3 million of time on multi-core, many-core, GPU-accelerated, and large-memory computing resources (which does not include additional consulting resources) – all at no cost to the researchers. Since its founding in 2011, XSEDE and XSEDE 2.0 have allocated an estimated $270M of computing time.”