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COVID Camouflage: TACC’s Frontera Reveals Virus’s ‘Sugar Coating’

Researchers using the Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) have uncovered the atomic makeup of the sugary shield on the coronavirus that could prove instrumental to the workings of the contagion, now spreading death, illness and economic destruction around the world. UCSD scientists have used about 2.3 million Frontera node hours for molecular dynamics simulations and modeling. 

TACC’s Frontera Supports Investigation of Subatomic Protons – ‘the Origin of the Mass of Objects’

A team of researchers are using the Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) to crack open the proton, a fundamental building block of the atomic nucleus that is used, among other ways, as a medical probe in magnetic resonance imaging. Frontera, the world’s fifth-ranked HPC system on the Top500 list and the […]

Interview: Fighting the Coronavirus with TACC Supercomputers

In this video from the Stanford HPC Conference, Dan Stanzione from the Texas Advanced Computing Center describes how their powerful supercomputers are helping to fight the coronavirus pandemic. “In times of global need like this, it’s important not only that we bring all of our resources to bear, but that we do so in the most innovative ways possible,” said TACC Executive Director Dan Stanzione. “We’ve pivoted many of our resources towards crucial research in the fight against COVID-19, but supporting the new AI methodologies in this project gives us the chance to use those resources even more effectively.”

TACC Powers Galaxy Bioinformatics Platform for COVID-19 Analysis

Researchers are using TACC supercomputers to power the Galaxy Bioinformatics Platform for COVID-19 analysis. More than 30,000 biomedical researchers run approximately 500,000 computing jobs a month on the platform. “Since 2013, TACC has powered the data analyses for a large percentage of Galaxy users, allowing researchers to quickly and seamlessly solve tough problems in cases where their personal computer or campus cluster is not sufficient.”

NSF awards compute time on Frontera Supercomputer for 49 projects

The most powerful supercomputer in the world for academic research has established its mission for the coming year. “The NSF has approved allocations of supercomputing time on Frontera to 49 science projects for 2020-2021. Time on the TACC supercomputer is awarded based on a project’s need for very large scale computing to make science and engineering discoveries, and the ability to efficiently use a supercomputer on the scale of Frontera.”

Supercomputing the Expansion of Wind Power

Researchers are using TACC supercomputers to map out a path towards growing wind power as an energy source in the United States. “This research is the first detailed study designed to develop scenarios for how wind energy can expand from the current levels of seven percent of U.S. electricity supply to achieve the 20 percent by 2030 goal outlined by the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in 2014.”

Supercomputing the Spread of Contagions on Airplanes

Researchers are using supercomputers to model how contagions can spread onboard aircraft. Using Frontera’s GPU subsystem, the researchers were able to get the computation time down to 1.5 minutes. “Using the GPUs turned out to be a fortunate choice because we were able to deploy these simulations in the COVID-19 emergency. The GPUs on Frontera are a means of generating answers fast.”

Podcast: Supercomputing the Coronavirus on Frontera

Scientists are preparing a massive computer model of the coronavirus that they expect will give insight into how it infects in the body. They’ve taken the first steps, testing the first parts of the model and optimizing code on the Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center of UT Austin. The knowledge gained from the full model can help researchers design new drugs and vaccines to combat the coronavirus.

XSEDE Supercomputers Complete Simulations Pertinent to coronavirus, DNA Replication

Fundamental research supported by XSEDE supercomputers could help lead to new strategies and better technology that combats infectious and genetic diseases. “Chemical reactions, life, doesn’t happen that quickly,” Roston said. “It happens on a timescale of people talking to each other. Bridging this gap in timescale of many, many orders of magnitude requires many steps in your simulations. It very quickly becomes computationally intractable.”

Podcast: Supercomputers Drive Ion Transport Research

In this TACC podcat, host Jorge Salazar discusses ion transport research with Amir Haji-Akbari, an assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering at Yale University. “Scientists are using supercomputers to help understand the relatively rare event of salts in water passing through atomically-thin nanoporous membranes. This research could not only help make progress in desalination for fresh water; it has applications in decontaminating the environment, better pharmaceuticals, and more.”