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Researchers Use TACC, SDSC and NASA Supercomputers to Forecast Corona of the Sun

Predictive Sciences ran a large-scale simulation of the Sun’s surface in preparation for a prediction of what the solar corona will look like during the eclipse. “The Solar eclipse allows us to see levels of the solar corona not possible even with the most powerful telescopes and spacecraft,” said Niall Gaffney, a former Hubble scientist and director of Data Intensive Computing at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. “It also gives high performance computing researchers who model high energy plasmas the unique ability to test our understanding of magnetohydrodynamics at a scale and environment not possible anywhere else.”

Podcast: 18 Petaflop Stampede 2 Supercomputer Powers Research at TACC

In this Texas Standard podcast, Dan Stanzione from TACC describes Stampede2, the most powerful university supercomputer in the United States. “Phase 1 of the Stampede2 rollout, now complete, features 4,200 Knights Landing (KNL) nodes, the second generation of processors based on Intel’s Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture. Later this summer Phase 2 will add 1,736 Intel Xeon Skylake nodes.”

Radio Free HPC Looks at Posit Computing

In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at the problems with IEEE Floating Point. “As described in a recent presentation by John Gustafson, the flaws and idiosyncrasies of floating-point arithmetic ‘constitute a sizable portion of any curriculum on Numerical Analysis.’ The whole thing has Dan pretty worked up, so we hope that the news of Posit Computing coming to the new processors from Rex Computing will help.”

18 Petaflop Stampede2 Supercomputer Dedicated at TACC

Stampede2 is the newest strategic supercomputing resource for the nation’s research and education community, enabling scientists and engineers across the U.S., from multiple disciplines, to answer questions at the forefront of science and engineering. “Building on the success of the initial Stampede system, the Stampede team has partnered with other institutions as well as industry to bring the latest in forward-looking computing technologies combined with deep computational and data science expertise to take on some of the most challenging science and engineering frontiers,” said Irene Qualters, director of NSF’s Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure.

Podcast: A Retrospective on Great Science and the Stampede Supercomputer

TACC will soon deploy Phase 2 of the Stampede II supercomputer. In this podcast, they celebrate by looking back on some of the great science computed on the original Stampede machine. “In 2017, the Stampede supercomputer, funded by the NSF, completed its five-year mission to provide world-class computational resources and support staff to more than 11,000 U.S. users on over 3,000 projects in the open science community. But what made it special? Stampede was like a bridge that moved thousands of researchers off of soon-to-be decommissioned supercomputers, while at the same time building a framework that anticipated the eminent trends that came to dominate advanced computing.”

Supercomputing DNA Packing in Nuclei at TACC

Aaron Dubrow writes that researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch are exploring DNA folding and cellular packing with supercomputing power from TACC. “In the field of molecular biology, there’s a wonderful interplay between theory, experiment and simulation,” Pettitt said. “We take parameters of experiments and see if they agree with the simulations and theories. This becomes the scientific method for how we now advance our hypotheses.”

Supercomputing New Tools for Cancer Detection

“In the future, though, it may be possible to diagnose cancer much earlier using more sensitive body scans, new types of biomarker tests, and even nano-sensors working in the bloodstream. Experimenting with these techniques in cancer patients or healthy individuals is difficult and potentially unethical. But scientists can test these technologies virtually using supercomputers to simulate the dynamics of cells and tissues.”

Supercomputing the Secrets of the Snake Genome at TACC

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington are using TACC supercomputers to study the unique traits of snake evolution. Led by assistant professor of biology Todd Castoe, the team is exploring the genomes of snakes and lizards to answer critical questions about these creatures’ evolutionary history. For instance, how did they develop venom? How do they regenerate their organs? And how do evolutionarily-derived variations in genes lead to variations in how organisms look and function? “Some of the most basic questions drive our research. Yet trying to understand the genetic explanations of such questions is surprisingly difficult considering most vertebrate genomes, including our own, are made up of literally billions of DNA bases that can determine how an organism looks and functions,” says Castoe. “Understanding these links between differences in DNA and differences in form and function is central to understanding biology and disease, and investigating these critical links requires massive computing power.”

TACC to Hosts HPC for Managers Institute in Austin

Today the TACC announced that the first High Performance Computing for Managers Institute will take place September 12-14 in Austin. “With course materials by TACC and the Numerical Algorithms Group, this three-day workshop is specifically tailored to managers and decision makers who are using, or considering using, HPC within their organizations. It is also applicable to those with a real opportunity to make this career step in the future.”

Supercomputing Cancer Data for Treatment Clues

In this video, researchers use TACC supercomputers in war against cancer. “Next-generation sequencing technology allows us to observe genomes and their activity in unprecedented detail,” he said. “It’s also making a lot of biomedical research increasingly computational, so it’s great to have a resource like TACC available to us.”