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Legendary Magnum InfiniBand Switch comes to Computer History Museum

The Computer History Museum in Silicon Valley recently added a piece of TACC’s history into their permanent historical collection — sealing its place as a milestone in computing.

We’re always searching around the world for new, interesting, and important computing objects,” said Dag Spicer, senior curator at the Computer History Museum. “TACC’s Sun Microsystems 2007 Magnum switch was a critical part of high-performance computing at that time in history. The TACC switch was the largest of its class and is an example of InfiniBand technology, which has long been a key enabling technology for high performance computing.”

Podcast: Supercomputing New Enzymes for Breaking Down Plastics

In this TACC podcast, Gregg Beckham from NREL and Lee Woodcock from the University of South Florida describe how they are using supercomputers to engineer an enzyme that breaks down plastic. “We used computer simulations to understand how a polymeric ligand like PET would be able to bind to the enzyme,” said study co-author Gregg Beckham, a Senior Research Fellow and Group Leader at the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). “We also conducted experimental work to show that indeed, the PETase can break down water or soda bottles, industrially relevant PET films, and another plastic, polyethylene furanoate.”

Mentorship fosters a Career in STEM

In this special guest feature, Faith Singer-Villalobos from TACC continues her series profiling Careers in STEM. It’s the inspiring story of Je’aime Powell, a TACC System Administrator and XSEDE Extended Collaborative Support Services Consultant. “Options, goals, and hope are what can set you on a path that can change your life,” Powell said.

Podcast: Supercomputing the Emergence of Material Behavior

In this TACC Podcast, Chemists at the University of California, San Diego describe how they used supercomputing to design a sheet of proteins that toggle between different states of porosity and density. This is a first in biomolecular design that combined experimental studies with computation done on supercomputers. “To meet these and other computational challenges, Paesani has been awarded supercomputer allocations through XSEDE, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment, funded by the National Science Foundation.”

Supercomputing How Cancer Spreads through Superdiffusion

Over a the University of Texas at Austin, Marc Airhart writes that researchers are using TACC supercomputers to better understand the physics behind the spread of cancer. “Having a physicist working on cancer can provide a new perspective into how a tumor evolves,” said Abdul Malmi-Kakkada, a postdoctoral researcher who led the project, along with postdoctoral researcher Xin Li, and professor and chair of chemistry Dave Thirumalai. “And rather than only looking at genetics or biology, trying to attack the problem of cancer from different perspectives can hopefully lead to a better understanding.”

Podcast: TACC Powers Deep Earth Imaging

“In this TACC Podcast, Ross Maguire and Jeroen Ritsema of the University of Michigan describe how supercomputer simulations of volcanos show how mantle plumes form and how they rise from Earth’s mantle. What’s more, the researchers say their work could guide future experiments with seismic imaging and help get to the bottom of mysteries like the origin of Hawaii’s volcanos.”

TACC Podcast Previews SXSW Session on Quantum Computing

In this TACC Podcast, Antia Lamas-Linares of the Texas Advanced Computing Center gives us a preview of her session on Quantum Computing at the SXSW conference. “Imagine a new kind of computer that can quickly solve problems that would stump even the world’s most powerful supercomputers. Quantum computers are fundamentally different. They can store information as not only just ones and zeros, but in all the shades of gray in-between. Several companies and government agencies are investing billions of dollars in the field of quantum information. But what will quantum computers be used for?”

XSEDE offers free HPC Training from Cornell Virtual Workshop

Today Cornell University announced that four new Cornell Virtual Workshop training topics are available at the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) user portal. “The Cornell University Center for Advanced Computing (CAC) is a leader in the development and deployment of Web-based training programs designed to enhance the computational skills of researchers, broaden the participation of underrepresented groups in the sciences and engineering, and accelerate the adoption of new and emerging technologies.”

TACC Podcast Looks at AI and Water Management

In this TACC podcast, Suzanne Pierce from the Texas Advanced Computing Center describes her upcoming panel discussion on AI and water management and the work TACC is doing to support efforts to bridge advanced computing with Earth science. “It’s about letting the AI help us be better decision makers. And it helps us move towards answering, discussing, and exploring the questions that are most important and most critical for our quality of life and our communities so that we can develop a future together that’s brighter.”

Podcast: Supercomputing Better Semiconductors for Solar Energy

Researchers are using XSEDE supercomputers to develop better semiconductors for solar engery. “Dr. Levine models the behavior caused by defects in materials, such as doping bulk silicon to transform it into semiconductors in transistors, LEDs, and solar cells. Levine and his team have used over 975,000 compute hours on the Maverick supercomputer, a dedicated visualization and data analysis resource architected with 132 NVIDIA Tesla K40 “Atlas” GPUs for remote visualization and GPU computing to the national community.”