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Japan Meteorological Agency to deploy Two Cray XC50 Supercomputers

Today Cray announced that the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) is implementing two Cray XC50 supercomputers at its site in Kiyose, Tokyo. These systems are expected to deliver a combined peak performance of more than 18 petaflops. The supercomputers will support JMA in better understanding, modeling and predicting the atmosphere, oceans and typhoons, as well as in general weather forecasting.

Celebrating 20 Years of the OpenMP API

“The first version of the OpenMP application programming interface (API) was published in October 1997. In the 20 years since then, the OpenMP API and the slightly older MPI have become the two stable programming models that high-performance parallel codes rely on. MPI handles the message passing aspects and allows code to scale out to significant numbers of nodes, while the OpenMP API allows programmers to write portable code to exploit the multiple cores and accelerators in modern machines.”

Pawsey Centre receives $70 Million for Supercomputing Down Under

Today the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre announced it has received $70 million in funding for a new supercomputing infrastructure. “This is a reflection of the government’s understanding of the value that the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre delivers to the Australian scientific landscape by accelerating innovation and increasing opportunities for engagement between Australian researchers and their peers internationally.”

Cray Adopts AMD EPYC Processors for Supercomputing

Cray is the first system vendor to offer an optimized programing environment for AMD EYPC processors, which is a distinct advantage. “Cray’s decision to offer the AMD EPYC processors in the Cray CS500 product line expands its market opportunities by offering buyers an important new choice,” said Steve Conway, senior vice president of research at Hyperion Research.

Ceph on the Brain: Storage and Data-Movement Supporting the Human Brain Project

Adrian Tate from Cray and Stig Telfer from StackHPC gave this talk at the 2018 Swiss HPC Conference. “This talk will describe how Cray, StackHPC and the HBP co-designed a next-generation storage system based on Ceph, exploiting complex memory hierarchies and enabling next-generation mixed workload execution. We will describe the challenges, show performance data and detail the ways that a similar storage setup may be used in HPC systems of the future.”

Using Ai to detect Gravitational Waves with the Blue Waters Supercomputer

NASA researchers are using AI technologies to detect gravitational waves. The work is described in a new article in Physics Review D this month. “This article shows that we can automatically detect and group together noise anomalies in data from the LIGO detectors by using artificial intelligence algorithms based on neural networks that were already pre-trained to classify images of real-world objects,” said research scientist, Eliu Huerta.

Jon Bashor Retires After 27 Years of Service to National Labs

LBNL Communications Manager Jon Bashor has announced his retirement after 27 years with the national lab system. “As communications manager, Jon has been key to the visibility of Berkeley Lab’s computing program, both through written articles and other material produced by Jon and his team and his community leadership—including several years of organizing the DOE booth at SC, the annual supercomputing conference,” said Associate Lab Director Kathy Yelick.

HPC Pioneer Burton Smith passes away

Burton J. Smith has passed away. An internationally recognized leader in HPC architecture, Smith was a co-founder of Tera Computing (later renamed Cray, Inc) and most recently a Microsoft technical fellow. Smith was 77. “Burton was an amazing intellect but more importantly, he was an amazing person. Every moment was important to him and he lived them all passionately. He touched many lives, made a profound impact in the world and will be missed by many,” said Todd Holmdahl, Smith’s colleague at Microsoft.

Cray to build FPGA-Accelerated Supercomputer for Paderborn University

Today Paderborn University in Germany announced that it has selected a Cray CS500 cluster system as its next-generation supercomputer. This procurement is the first phase of the Noctua project in which a multi-petaflop-system with a total budget of 10M euros. The initial HPC system provides academic researchers from Paderborn University and nationwide with computing resources primarily for computational material science, optoelectronics and photonics, and computer system research. The system is expected to go into production in 2018.

Cray rolls out new Cray Artificial Intelligence Offerings

Today Cray announced it is adding new options to its line of CS-Storm GPU-accelerated servers as well as improved fast-start AI configurations, making it easier for organizations implementing AI to get started on their journey with AI proof-of-concept projects and pilot-to-production use. “As companies approach AI projects, choices in system size and configuration play a crucial role,” said Fred Kohout, Cray’s senior vice president of products and chief marketing officer. “Our customers look to Cray Accel AI offerings to leverage our supercomputing expertise, technologies and best practices. Whether an organization wants a starter system for model development and testing, or a complete system for data preparation, model development, training, validation and inference, Cray Accel AI configurations provide customers a complete supercomputer system.”