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Video: Intel and Cray to Build First USA Exascale Supercomputer for DOE in 2021

Today Intel announced plans to deliver the first exaflop supercomputer in the United States. The Aurora supercomputer will be used to dramatically advance scientific research and discovery. The contract is valued at more than $500 million and will be delivered to Argonne National Laboratory by Intel and sub-contractor Cray in 2021. “Today is an important day not only for the team of technologists and scientists who have come together to build our first exascale computer – but also for all of us who are committed to American innovation and manufacturing,” said Bob Swan, Intel CEO.”

Video: Solving I/O Slowdown and the “Noisy Neighbor” Problem

John Fragalla from Cray gave this talk at the Rice Oil & Gas Conference. “In Oil and Gas, when using shared storage, mixed workloads can have a big impact on I/O performance causing considerable slowdown when running small I/O alongside large I/O on the same storage system. In this presentation, Cray will share real benchmark results on the impacts of the “Noisy Neighbor” application has on sequential I/O, and with the right storage tuning and flash capacity, how to optimize the storage to meet the demanding workloads of Oil and Gas to accelerate performance for a mixed workload environment.”

NERSC Hosts GPU Hackathon in Preparation for Perlmutter Supercomputer

NERSC recently hosted a successful GPU Hackathon event in preparation for their next-generation Perlmutter supercomputer. Perlmutter, a pre-exascale Cray Shasta system slated to be delivered in 2020, will feature a number of new hardware and software innovations and is the first supercomputing system designed with both data analysis and simulations in mind. Unlike previous NERSC systems, Perlmutter will use a combination of nodes with only CPUs, as well as nodes featuring both CPUs and GPUs.

Truly Inspiring: Fighting World Hunger with Cray Supercomputers

In this video, Computational biologist Laura Boykin describes the threat to lives and livelihoods the whitefly represents, the international effort to fight it, and how supercomputing flips the script on a once unwinnable war. “Cray supports visionaries like Laura and her scientific colleagues in East Africa in combining computation and creativity to change outcomes.”

The State of High-Performance Fabrics: A Chat with the OpenFabrics Alliance

In this special guest feature, Paul Grun and Doug Ledford from the OpenFabrics Alliance describe the industry trends in the fabrics space, its state of affairs and emerging applications. “Originally, ‘high-performance fabrics’ were associated with large, exotic HPC machines. But in the modern world, these fabrics, which are based on technologies designed to improve application efficiency, performance, and scalability, are becoming more and more common in the commercial sphere because of the increasing demands being placed on commercial systems.”

Looking Back at SC18 and the Road Ahead to Exascale

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Robert Roe reports on new technology and 30 years of the US supercomputing conference at SC18 in Dallas. “From our volunteers to our exhibitors to our students and attendees – SC18 was inspirational,” said SC18 general chair Ralph McEldowney. “Whether it was in technical sessions or on the exhibit floor, SC18 inspired people with the best in research, technology, and information sharing.”

NOAA Report: Effects of Persistent Arctic Warming Continue to Mount

NOAA is out with their 2018 Arctic Report Card and the news is not good, folks. Issued annually since 2006, the Arctic Report Card is a timely and peer-reviewed source for clear, reliable and concise environmental information on the current state of different components of the Arctic environmental system relative to historical records. “The Report Card is intended for a wide audience, including scientists, teachers, students, decision-makers and the general public interested in the Arctic environment and science.”

Video: Cray Steps up with Shasta Platform for Exascale Supercomputing

In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Per Nyberg from Cray describes the company’s new Shasta supercomputing architecture for exascale. “Shasta is an entirely new design and is set to be the technology that underpins the next era of supercomputing, characterized by exascale performance capability, new data-centric workloads, and an explosion of processor architectures. With sweeping hardware and software innovations, Shasta incorporates next-generation Cray system software to enable modularity and extensibility, a new Cray-designed system interconnect, unparalleled flexibility in processing choice within a system, and a software environment that provides for seamless scalability.”

AMD Speeds HPC and Ai with EPYC Processors and Radeon GPUs

In this video from SC18, Derek Bouius from AMD describes how the company’s new EPYC processors and Radeon GPUs can speed HPC and Ai applications. “It’s been a fantastic year in the supercomputing space as we further expanded the ecosystem for AMD EPYC processors while securing multiple wins that leverage the benefits AMD EPYC processors have on HPC workloads,’ said Mark Papermaster, senior vice president and chief technology officer, AMD. ‘As the HPC industry approaches exascale systems, we’re at the beginning of a new era of heterogeneous compute that requires a combination of CPU, GPU and software that only AMD can deliver. We’re excited to have fantastic customers leading the charge with our Radeon Instinct accelerators, AMD EPYC processors and the ROCm open software platform.”

An Update on Piz Daint – the Fastest Supercomputer in Europe

In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Michele De Lorenzi from CSCS in Switzerland provides an update on Piz Daint, the fastest supercomputer in Europe. “Recently upgraded with two additional cabinets full of NVIDIA V100 GPUs, the Cray XC50 system comes in at #5 in the world with 21.23 Petaflops of performance on the LINPACK benchmark.”