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Video: Cray Announces First Exascale System

In this video, Cray CEO Pete Ungaro announces Aurora – Argonne National Laboratory’s forthcoming supercomputer and the United States’ first exascale system. Ungaro offers some insight on the technology, what makes exascale performance possible, and why we’re going to need it. “It is an exciting testament to Shasta’s flexible design and unique system and software capabilities, along with our Slingshot interconnect, which will be the foundation for Argonne’s extreme-scale science endeavors and data-centric workloads. Shasta is designed for this transformative exascale era and the convergence of artificial intelligence, analytics and modeling and simulation– all at the same time on the same system — at incredible scale.”

Video: Intel and Cray to Build First USA Exascale Supercomputer for DOE in 2021

Today Intel announced plans to deliver the first exaflop supercomputer in the United States. The Aurora supercomputer will be used to dramatically advance scientific research and discovery. The contract is valued at more than $500 million and will be delivered to Argonne National Laboratory by Intel and sub-contractor Cray in 2021. “Today is an important day not only for the team of technologists and scientists who have come together to build our first exascale computer – but also for all of us who are committed to American innovation and manufacturing,” said Bob Swan, Intel CEO.”

ALCF – The March toward Exascale

David E. Martin gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “In 2021, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) will deploy Aurora, a new Intel-Cray system. Aurora, will be capable of over 1 exaflops. It is expected to have over 50,000 nodes and over 5 petabytes of total memory, including high bandwidth memory. The Aurora architecture will enable scientific discoveries using simulation, data and learning.”

With Exascale Looming, this is an Exciting Time for Computational Science

In this video from the 2017 CGSF Review Meeting, Barbara Helland from the Department of Energy presents: With Exascale Looming, this is an Exciting Time for Computational Science. “Helland was also a presenter this week at the ASCR Advisory Committee Meeting, where she disclosed that the Aurora 21 Supercomputer coming to Argonne in 2021 will indeed be an exascale machine.”

Radio Free HPC Runs Down the Latest TOP500

In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at the latest TOP500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers. It’s Day 1 here at the ISC 2017 conference, and we’ll be keeping you posted on all the news as the show goes June 18-22 in Frankfurt, Germany.

Is Aurora Morphing into an Exascale AI Supercomputer?

The recently published Department of Energy FY 2018 Congressional Budget Request has raised a lot of questions about the Aurora supercomputer that was scheduled to be deployed at Argonne ALCF next year. “As we covered in our Radio Free HPC podcast, Aurora appears to be morphing into a very different kind of machine.”

In Search Of: Radio Free HPC on the Hunt for the Aurora Supercomputer

In this podcast, Rich notes that recent reports on the Aurora supercomputer were incorrect. According to Rick Borchelt from the DoE: “On the record, Aurora contract is not cancelled.” Before that, we follow Henry on an unprecedented shopping spree at Best Buy.

Argonne to Install 1.5 Petaflop Cray CS400 Cluster

Today Cray announced a contract to deliver a Cray CS400 cluster supercomputer to the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) at Argonne National Laboratory. The new Cray system will serve as the Center’s flagship cluster, and in continuing with LCRC’s theme of jazz-music inspired computer names, the Cray CS400 system is named “Bebop.”

Argonne Seeking Proposals to Advance Big Data in Science

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Data Science Program (ADSP) is now accepting proposals for projects hoping to gain insight into very large datasets produced by experimental, simulation, or observational methods. The larger the data, in fact, the better. Applications are due by June 15, 2017.

Argonne Annouces Early Science Projects for Aurora Supercomputer

Argonne has selected 10 computational science and engineering research projects for its Aurora Early Science Program starting this month. Aurora, a massively parallel, manycore Intel-Cray supercomputer, will be ALCF’s next leadership-class computing resource and is expected to arrive in 2018. The Early Science Program helps lay the path for hundreds of other users by doing actual science, using real scientific applications, to ready a future machine. “As with any bleeding edge resource, there’s testing and debugging that has to be done,” said ALCF Director of Science Katherine Riley.