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Video: HPC Reservoir Simulations on AWS with NICE

In this video, Scott Harrison from Rock Flow Dynamics and Bruno Franzini from NICE Software explain how they scale HPC workloads in the cloud. “You’ll learn how they leverage Amazon EC2 Spot instances and Amazon S3 to create cost-effective, scalable clusters that power tNavigator, Rock Flow Dynamics’ solution for running dynamic reservoir simulations. You’ll also see how they use NICE Software’s DCV to stream the OpenGL-based user interface to interact with 3D models.”

Microsoft Acquires Cycle Computing

Today Microsoft announced it has acquired Cycle Computing, a software company focused on making cloud computing resources more readily available for HPC workloads. “Now supporting InfiniBand and accelerated GPU computing, Microsoft Azure looks to be a perfect home for Cycle Computing, which started its journey with software for aggregating compute resources at AWS. The company later added similar capabilities for Azure and Google Cloud.”

Rescale to Enable Fast and Secure Data Transfer to the Cloud with Equinix

“Although many enterprises have already made the move to cloud for certain data services, many are reluctant to make the move for one of their largest investments: on-premise, high-performance computing,” said Tyler Smith, Head of Partnerships at Rescale. “Rescale helps ease the migration process with a hybrid and burst solution, making best use of existing and cloud resources in tandem, and the partnership with Equinix adds a compelling layer of ultra high-speed data transfer and best-in-class security, while allowing the enterprise to keep their preferred private/public cloud model.”

Will the Cloud steal my job?

In this special guest feature, Dr Rosemary Francis from Ellexus describes why the HPC Community has little to fear from the rise of Cloud Computing. “AWS alone has eight different types of storage that vary hugely in terms of storage size, bandwidth, peak performance and other more complex metrics. It’s not a ‘one set-up’ solution. If you’ve spent time optimizing your on-prem cluster for each different run or set of user expectations, you’re just going to have to do the same in the cloud.”

HPC Speeds NASCAR at OSC

In this video, Ray Leto from Total Sim LLC describes how his firm uses supercomputing resources at OSC to speed NASCAR simulations. “Designers and engineers utilizing common CAD or CAE software on desktop computers often encounter limitations in the modeling and simulation (M&S) they can efficiently perform. High Performance Computing provides an improvement in computational capacity compared to typical general-purpose computers. The increased power and speed that HPC provides allows more detailed models to be simulated faster.”

Rescale Partners with HPC Systems in Japan

Today Rescale announced a channel partnership with HPC Systems Inc., a high-performance computing hardware integrator based in Japan, to deliver Rescale’s ScaleX big compute platform to the Japanese market beginning July 2017. “We are extremely pleased to be partnering with HPC Systems, whose diverse services and products have a proven track record in Japanese computational science,” said Rescale’s CEO Joris Poort. “Our partnership will provide joint customers with new potential for innovation and will accelerate research in materials and drug development and discovery.”

Video: Building a GPU-enabled OpenStack Cloud for HPC

Blair Bethwaite and Lance Wilson from Monash University gave this talk at OpenStack Australia. “M3 is the latest generation system of the MASSIVE project, an HPC facility specializing in characterization science (imaging and visualization). Using OpenStack as the compute provisioning layer, M3 is a hybrid HPC/cloud system, custom-integrated by Monash’s Research Cloud team. Built to support Monash University’s high-throughput instrument processing requirements, M3 is half-half GPU-accelerated and CPU-only. We’ll discuss the design and tech used to build this innovative platform as well as detailing approaches and challenges to building GPU-enabled and HPC clouds.”

One Stop Systems Named One of San Diego’s Fastest Growing Companies

Not all HPC vendors are experiencing a slump. In fact, One Stop Systems was recently named one of San Diego’s 100 fastest growing privately-held companies by the San Diego Business Journal. “One Stop Systems continues to provide leading edge technology products to the high performance computing (HPC) market, propelling its growth,” says Steve Cooper, CEO of OSS. “Along with quality systems and responsive sales, OSS has consistently placed among the nations’ leading growth companies. In the past few years, OSS has introduced several new products that bring unparalleled performance and density to the market. We’ve also expanded into the cloud computing business by allowing customers to lease time on our HPC appliances.”

Video: Scalable Deep Learning with Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit (CNTK)

“Microsoft AI researchers are striving to create intelligent machines that complement human reasoning and enrich human experiences and capabilities. At the core, is the ability to harness the explosion of digital data and computational power with advanced algorithms that extend the ability for machines to learn, reason, sense and understand—enabling collaborative and natural interactions between machines and humans.”

Supercomputing by API: Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC

In this video from OpenStack Australia, David Perry from the University of Melbourne presents: Supercomputing by API – Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC. “OpenStack is a free and open-source set of software tools for building and managing cloud computing platforms for public and private clouds. OpenStack Australia Day is the region’s largest, and Australia’s best, conference focusing on Open Source cloud technology. Gathering users, vendors and solution providers, OpenStack Australia Day is an industry event to showcase the latest technologies and share real-world experiences of the next wave of IT virtualization.”