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NVIDIA GPUs Power Fujitsu AI Supercomputer at RIKEN in Japan

Fujitsu has posted news that their new AI supercomputer at RIKEN in Japan is already being used for AI research. Called RAIDEN (Riken AIp Deep learning ENvironment), the GPU-accelerated Fujitsu system sports 4 Petaflops of processing power. “The RAIDEN supercomputer is built around Fujitsu PRIMERGY RX 2530 M2 servers with and 24 NVIDIA DGX-1 systems. With 8 NVIDIA Tesla GPUs per chassis, the DGX-1 includes access to today’s most popular deep learning frameworks.”

Panel Looks at ARM’s Advance towards HPC

In this video from the ARM Research Summit, industry thought leaders discuss the challenges, opportunities, and technical hurdles for the ARM architecture to thrive in the HPC market. “The panel will focus on Arm in HPC, Software & Hardware differentiation and direction for exascale and beyond, thoughts on accelerators, and more!”

Nvidia to Power Fujitsu’s New Deep Learning System at RIKEN

Today Fujitsu announced that it has received RIKEN’s order for the “Deep learning system,” one of the largest supercomputers in Japan specializing in AI research. “NVIDIA DGX-1, the world’s first all-in-one AI supercomputer, is designed to meet the enormous computational needs of AI researchers,” said Jim McHugh, VP & GM at Nvidia. “Powered by 24 DGX-1s, the RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project’s system will be the most powerful DGX-1 customer installation in the world. Its breakthrough performance will dramatically speed up deep learning research in Japan, and become a platform for solving complex problems in healthcare, manufacturing and public safety.”

Apply Now for 2017 International Summer School on HPC Challenges

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from institutions in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States are invited to apply for the eighth International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Computational Sciences, to be held June 25- 30, 2017, in Boulder, Colorado.

Video: Japan’s Post K Computer

Yutaka Ishikawa from Riken AICS presented this talk at the HPC User Forum. “Slated for delivery sometime around 2022, the ARM-based Post-K Computer has a performance target of being 100 times faster than the original K computer within a power envelope that will only be 3-4 times that of its predecessor. RIKEN AICS has been appointed as the main organization for leading the development of the Post-K.”

Finalists Announced for Gordon Bell Prize in HPC

“High performance computing continues to underwrite the progress of research using computational methods for the analysis and modeling of complex phenomena,” said Vint Cerf and John White, ACM Award Committee co-chairs, in a statement. “This year’s finalists illustrate the key role that high performance computing plays in 21st Century research. The Gordon Bell Award committee has worked diligently to select from many choices, those most deserving of recognition for this year. Like everyone else, we will be eager to learn which of the nominees takes the top prize for 2016.”

ARM to Power New RIKEN Supercomputer

ARM processors will provide the computational muscle behind one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, replacing the current K computer at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) in Japan. During the ISC conference, Fujitsu released details of the new system during a presentation with Fujitsu vice president Toshiyuki Shimizu. Shimizu stated that the “post K” system, which is set to go live in 2020, will have 100 times more application performance than the K supercomputer.

Efforts to Broaden HPC Accelerate as OpenHPC Governing Board and Technical Steering Committee Takes Shape

Since its announcement at SC15 in November, the OpenHPC community has made important strides toward its mission of creating and supporting a flexible open source HPC software stack that simplifies deploying and managing HPC systems. In just a few short months, the open source community hosted at The Linux Foundation has had many productive working group discussions, installed a Technical Steering Committee (TSC) and Governing Board, and even provided releases of the initial software stack based on early community feedback. The initial software stack includes over 60 packages, including tools and libraries, as well as provisioning, a job scheduler and more.

Video: System Software in Post K Supercomputer

“The next flagship supercomputer in Japan, replacement of K supercomputer, is being designed toward general operation in 2020. Compute nodes, based on a manycore architecture, connected by a 6-D mesh/torus network is considered. A three level hierarchical storage system is taken into account. A heterogeneous operating system, Linux and a light-weight kernel, is designed to build suitable environments for applications. It can not be possible without codesign of applications that the system software is designed to make maximum utilization of compute and storage resources. “

Apply for International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Slovenia

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from institutions in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States are invited to apply for the seventh International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Computational Sciences, to be held June 26 to July 1, 2016, in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The summer school is sponsored by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) with funds from the U.S. National Science Foundation, Compute/Calcul Canada, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) and the RIKEN Advanced Insti­tute for Computational Science (RIKEN AICS).