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Panel Discussion on Disruptive Technologies for HPC

In this video from the HPC User Forum, Bob Sorensen from Hyperion Research moderates a panel discussion on Disruptive Technologies for HPC. “A disruptive innovation is an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market leading firms, products and alliances. The term was defined and phenomenon analyzed by Clayton M. Christensen beginning in 1995.”

The Computer That Could Be Smarter than Us – Cognitive Computing

Ingolf Wittmann from IBM presented this talk for the Switzerland HPC Conference. “This presentation will point out based on real examples how HPC environments can benefit from such solutions and technologies to drive cognitive solutions, machine/deep learning where we can ask ourselves, ‘What will be possible in the near future – can the future computers be smarter than humans?”

Rock Stars of HPC: John Stone

This Rock Stars of HPC series is about the men and women who are changing the way the HPC community develops, deploys, and operates the supercomputers and social and economic impact of their discoveries. “As the lead developer of the VMD molecular visualization and analysis tool, John Stone’s code is used by more than 100,000 researchers around the world. He’s also a CUDA Fellow, helping to bring HPC to the masses with accelerated computing. In this way and many others, John Stone is certainly one of the Rock Stars of HPC.”

Rambus Collaborates with Microsoft on Cryogenic Memory

“With the increasing challenges in conventional approaches to improving memory capacity and power efficiency, our early research indicates that a significant change in the operating temperature of DRAM using cryogenic techniques may become essential in future memory systems,” said Dr. Gary Bronner, vice president of Rambus Labs. “Our strategic partnership with Microsoft has enabled us to identify new architectural models as we strive to develop systems utilizing cryogenic memory. The expansion of this collaboration will lead to new applications in high-performance supercomputers and quantum computers.”

Quantum Startup Rigetti Computing Raises $64 Million in Funding

Today Rigetti Computing, a leading quantum computing start-up, announced it has raised $64 million in Series A and B funding. “Quantum computing will enable people to tackle a whole new set of problems that were previously unsolvable,” said Chad Rigetti, founder and chief executive officer of Rigetti Computing. “This is the next generation of advanced computing technology. The potential to make a positive impact on humanity is enormous.”

New ARM Architecture Targets AI

ARM has taken a step into the artificial intelligence market with the announcement of a new micro-architecture – DynamIQ – specifically designed for artificial intelligence (AI). “DynamIQ technology is a monumental shift in multi-core microarchitecture for the industry and the foundation for future ARM Cortex-A processors. The flexibility and versatility of DynamIQ will redefine the multi-core experience across a greater range of devices from edge to cloud across a secure, common platform.”

Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab to Install D-Wave 2000Q System

Today D-Wave Systems announced that Google, NASA, and Universities Space Research Association (USRA) have elected to upgrade to the new D-Wave 2000Q system. The upgraded system will support research on how quantum computing can be applied to artificial intelligence, machine learning, and difficult optimization problems. The new system will be the third generation of D-Wave technology installed at Ames,” said D-Wave CEO Vern Brownell. “We are pleased that Google, NASA, and USRA value the increased performance embodied in our latest generation of technology, the D-Wave 2000Q system, for their critical applications.”

D-Wave Collaborates with Virginia Tech on Quantum Computing

Today D-Wave Systems and Virginia Tech announced a joint effort to provide greater access to quantum computers for researchers from the Intelligence Community and Department of Defense. D-Wave and Virginia Tech will work towards the creation of a permanent quantum computing center to house a D-Wave system at the Hume Center for National Security and Technology. “Both D-Wave and Virginia Tech recognize how vital it is that quantum computing be accessible to a broad community of experts focused on solving real-world problems,” said Bo Ewald, president of D-Wave International. “One of the many reasons we chose to work with Virginia Tech is their strong relationships with the intelligence and defense communities. A key area of focus will be to work with federal agencies towards the creation of a quantum computing center at the Hume Center.”

Future Technologies on the Rise for HPC

“2017 will see the introduction of many technologies that will help shape the future of HPC systems. Production-scale ARM supercomputers, advancements in memory and storage technology such as DDN’s Infinite Memory Engine (IME), and much wider adoption of accelerator technologies and from Nvidia, Intel and FPGA manufacturers such as Xilinx and Altera, are all helping to define the supercomputers of tomorrow.”

Podcast: IBM Researchers Store Data on a Single Atom

Today IBM announced it has created the world’s smallest magnet using a single atom – and stored one bit of data on it. Currently, hard disk drives use about 100,000 atoms to store a single bit. The ability to read and write one bit on one atom creates new possibilities for developing significantly smaller and denser storage devices, that could someday, for example, enable storing the entire iTunes library of 35 million songs on a device the size of a credit card.