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Two More Steps Towards Quantum Computing

Correlated syndrome single-shot histograms and quantum state tomography of code qubits.

Quantum computing has taken a step closer with two recent announcements demonstrating methods for error correction in addition to a new scalable design for quantum circuits based on a lattice structure.

Podcast: Cray’s Steve Scott on Programming for the Next Decade

Steve Scott

“Our computing systems continue to evolve, providing significant challenges to the programming teams managing large, long-lived projects. Issues include rapidly increasing on-node parallelism, varying forms of heterogeneity, deepening memory hierarchies, growing concerns around resiliency and silent data corruption, and worsening storage bottlenecks.”

Alternatives to x86: Future Processing Technologies

Robert Roe

In the second article in his series on future hardware for HPC, Robert Roe from Scientific Computing World looks at alternatives to the x86, including server on a chip and OpenPower.

ANSYS Powers Quantum Computing Engineering at D-Wave

ansys

D-Wave Systems reports that the company is designing and building the world’s most advanced quantum computers with help from engineering simulation solutions from ANSYS. This next generation of supercomputers uses quantum mechanics to massively accelerate computation and has the potential to solve some of the most complex computing problems facing organizations today.

HPC News Roundup for Friday, May 8

hatnews

It can be tough to keep up with all that’s happening in HPC these days. Here are some notable items that may have not made it to the front page.

Interview: Intel’s Alan Gara Discusses the 180 Petaflop Aurora Supercomputer

Alan Gara, Intel

In this interview, Intel’s Alan Gara describes the Aurora system, a 180 Petaflop supercomputer coming to Argonne. “The Aurora system is based on our Omni-Path second generation. This is an Intel interconnect that we’ve been developing for some time now, and we’re really excited about the capabilities that we expect and scalability that we expect it to bring to high performance computing.”

Optalysys Develops Prototype Optical Processing System

prototype

Today Optalysys announced that the company has successfully developed a demonstrable prototype that can process mathematical functions optically in a scaleable, lensless design. According to the company, Optalysys optical processing systems will “turbo-charge” existing computers by performing processor-intensive tasks at much faster rates and with a significant reduction in energy consumption.

Video: How Aurora Will Usher in a New Era for HPC

raj

“The selection of Intel to deliver the Aurora supercomputer is validation of our unique position to lead a new era in HPC,” said Raj Hazra, vice president, Data Center Group and general manager, Technical Computing Group at Intel. “Intel’s HPC scalable system framework enables balanced, scalable and efficient systems while extending the ecosystem’s decades of software investment to future generations. We look forward to the numerous scientific discoveries and the far-reaching impacts on society that Aurora will enable.”

HPC Helps Solve Challenges of Personalized Medicine

Genomic Sequencing

A number of challenges exist for both the wider adoption of technologies that can impede personalized medicine workflows and the implementation of such systems. Learn more on how companies like Dell and Intel are delivering complete integrated genomic processing infrastructure.

A Closer Look at Intel’s Coral Supercomputers Coming to Argonne

coral

This morning Intel and the U.S. Department of Energy announced a $200 million supercomputing investment coming to Argonne National Laboratory. As the third of three Coral supercomputer procurements, the deal will comprise an 8.5 Petaflop “Theta” system based on Knights Landing in 2016 and a much larger 180 Petaflop “Aurora” supercomputer in 2018. Intel will be the prime contractor on the deal, with sub-contractor Cray building the actual supercomputers.