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Supercomputing RNA Structure at Argonne

Over at ALCF, Joan Koka writes that researchers at the National Cancer Institute are using Argonne supercomputers to advance disease studies by enhancing our understanding of RNA, biological polymers that are fundamentally involved in health and disease. “Getting the real functional structure, which is the 3-D structure, is very difficult to do experimentally, because the RNA polymer is too flexible,” he said. “This is why we rely on computational simulation. Simulations can be used to explore hundreds or thousands of possible conformational states that would eventually lead us to the most likely 3-D structure.”

Asetek Announces Regional OEM HPC installation

Today Asetek announced an order from a new European OEM customer to service demand for an HPC (High Performance Computing) installation. “The order is for Asetek’s RackCDU D2C (Direct-to-Chip) liquid cooling solution and is valued at $32,000 USD with delivery scheduled for Q3 2017.”

SKA and CERN Sign Big Data Agreement

“The signature of this collaboration agreement between two of the largest producers of science data on the planet shows that we are really entering a new era of science worldwide”, said Prof. Philip Diamond, SKA Director-General. “Both CERN and SKA are and will be pushing the limits of what is possible technologically, and by working together and with industry, we are ensuring that we are ready to make the most of this upcoming data and computing surge.”

Teradata Acquires StackIQ

Today Teradata announced the acquisition of StackIQ, developers of one of the industry’s fastest bare metal software provisioning platforms which has managed the deployment of cloud and analytics software at millions of servers in data centers around the globe. The deal will leverage StackIQ’s expertise in open source software and large cluster provisioning to simplify and automate the deployment of Teradata Everywhere. Offering customers the speed and flexibility to deploy Teradata solutions across hybrid cloud environments, allows them to innovate quickly and build new analytical applications for their business. “Teradata prides itself on building and investing in solutions that make life easier for our customers,” said Oliver Ratzesberger, Executive Vice President and Chief Product Officer for Teradata. “Only the best, most innovative and applicable technology is added to our ecosystem, and StackIQ delivers with products that excel in their field. Adding StackIQ technology to IntelliFlex, IntelliBase and IntelliCloud will strengthen our capabilities and enable Teradata to redefine how systems are deployed and managed globally.”

WekaIO Unveils Industry’s First Cloud-native Scalable File System

Today WekaIO, a venture backed high-performance cloud storage software company, today emerged from stealth to introduce the industry’s first cloud-native scalable file system that delivers unprecedented performance to applications, scaling to Exabytes of data in a single namespace. Headquartered in San Jose, CA, WekaIO has developed the first software platform that harnesses flash technology to create a high-performance parallel scale out file storage solution for both on-premises servers and public clouds.
Data is at the heart of every business but many industries are hurt by the performance limitations of their storage infrastructure,” said Michael Raam, president and CEO of WekaIO. “We are heralding a new era of storage, having developed a true scale-out data infrastructure that puts independent, on-demand capacity and performance control into the hands of our customers. It’s exciting to be part of a company that delivers a true revolution for the storage industry.”

Alan Turing Institute to Acquire Cray Urika-GX Graph Supercomputer

Today Cray announced the Company will provide a Cray Urika-GX system to the Alan Turing Institute. “The rise of data-intensive computing – where big data analytics, artificial intelligence, and supercomputing converge – has opened up a new domain of real-world, complex analytics applications, and the Cray Urika-GX gives our customers a powerful platform for solving this new class of data-intensive problems.”

Silicon Mechanics steps up with Intel Xeon Scalable Processors

Today Silicon Mechanics announced immediate availability of Intel’s new family of processors, the Intel Xeon Scalable platform, formerly code-named Purley. Intel’s newest processing platform features a selection of Intel Xeon processors designed to scale with a business as it grows, from an entry-level Bronze processor to the Intel Xeon Platinum processor for maximum performance, hardware-enhanced security, and advanced RAS (reliability, availability, and serviceability). “As a long-term Strategic OEM partner with Intel, we are excited to bring the Intel Xeon Scalable platform to our customers on day one,” said Silicon Mechanics Chief Marketing Officer Sue Lewis. “Our customers have been excited about the expected improvements in memory bandwidth and performance, and through our close-working partnership with Intel, we are ready to help them deploy systems based on the new processors now.”

New Intel Xeon Scalable Processors Accelerate HPC Systems

Intel outlines the highlights and features of the company’s new Intel Xeon Scalable processors designed to accelerate HPC systems. The Intel Xeon processor Scalable Family, the newest Intel Xeon processors, are optimized to address today’s most demanding high-performance computing challenges.

New Intel Xeon Scalable Processors Boost HPC Performance

The new Intel Xeon Scalable Processors provide up to a 2x FLOPs/clock improvement1 with Intel AVX-512 as well as integrated Intel Omni-Path Architecture ports, delivering improved compute capability, I/O flexibility and memory bandwidth to accelerate discovery and innovation.

Developing a Software Stack for Exascale

In this special guest feature, Rajeev Thakur from Argonne describes why Exascale would be a daunting software challenge even if we had the hardware today. “The scale makes it complicated. And we don’t have a system that large to test things on right now.” Indeed, no such system exists yet, the hardware is changing, and a final vendor or possibly multiple vendors to build the first exascale systems have not yet been selected.”