Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:

Princeton Team using Deep Learning to develop Fusion Energy

Over at the NVIDIA Blog, Tonie Hansen writes that Princeton researchers are using deep learning to help establish the feasibility of delivering fusion energy in the foreseeable future. “The Princeton team has scaled up the capabilities of its FRNN software using thousands of GPUs to train deep neural networks. After successfully running on 6,000 Tesla K20 GPUs on Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan supercomputer, FRNN has recently demonstrated the ability to scale to 3,000 NVIDIA Tesla P100 GPUs on Japan’s new TSUBAME-3 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology.”

David Bader from Georgia Tech Joins PASC18 Speaker Lineup

Today PASC18 announced that this year’s Public Lecture will be held by David Bader from Georgia Tech. Dr. Bader will speak on Massive-Scale Analytics Applied to Real-World Problems. “Emerging real-world graph problems include: detecting and preventing disease in human populations; revealing community structure in large social networks; and improving the resilience of the electric power grid. Unlike traditional applications in computational science and engineering, solving these social problems at scale often raises new challenges because of the sparsity and lack of locality in the data, the need for research on scalable algorithms and development of frameworks for solving these real-world problems on high performance computers, and for improved models that capture the noise and bias inherent in the torrential data streams. This talk will discuss the opportunities and challenges in massive data-intensive computing for applications in social sciences, physical sciences, and engineering.”

Video: NREL Evaluates Aquarius Liquid Cooling Technology for HPC

Today Aquila announced delivery and installation of the first ever fixed cold plate liquid cooled Aquarius HPC system. Sandia National Laboratories has deployed the system at the NREL in order to fully study the benefits of Aquila’s fixed cold plate warm water cooling technology. “We feel their leadership will help shape the future of HPC and influence the modern data center designer towards adoption of liquid cooling. Our shared vision holds the promise of improving data center energy efficiency by as much as 50%.”

TACC Podcast Previews SXSW Session on Quantum Computing

In this TACC Podcast, Antia Lamas-Linares of the Texas Advanced Computing Center gives us a preview of her session on Quantum Computing at the SXSW conference. “Imagine a new kind of computer that can quickly solve problems that would stump even the world’s most powerful supercomputers. Quantum computers are fundamentally different. They can store information as not only just ones and zeros, but in all the shades of gray in-between. Several companies and government agencies are investing billions of dollars in the field of quantum information. But what will quantum computers be used for?”

Let’s Talk Exascale Podcast Looks at Co-Design Center for Particle-Based Applications

In this Let’s Talk Exascale podcast, Tim Germann from Los Alamos National Laboratory discusses the ECP’s Co-Design Center for Particle Applications (COPA). “COPA serves as centralized clearinghouse for particle-based methods, and as first users on immature simulators, emulators, and prototype hardware. Deliverables include ‘Numerical Recipes for Particles’ best practices, libraries, and a scalable open exascale software platform.”

New Mellanox Onyx Ethernet Network Operating System boosts Devops

Today Mellanox announced the release of Mellanox Onyx – the industry-leading open and flexible Ethernet Network Operating System for Mellanox Spectrum Open Ethernet switches. “Mellanox Onyx offers a mature Layer-3 feature-set, with integrated support for standard Devops tools, allowing customers to run third party containerized applications with complete SDK access. By utilizing Mellanox Onyx’s leading capabilities, our customers can enjoy the benefits of an industry-standard Layer-2 and Layer3 feature-set along with the ability to customize and optimize the network to their specific needs.”

Google Goes for Quantum Supremacy with 72-Qbit Bristlecone Chip

Over at the Google Research Blog, Julian Kelly writes that the company has developed a new 72-Qbit quantum processor called Bristlecone. “We are cautiously optimistic that quantum supremacy can be achieved with Bristlecone, and feel that learning to build and operate devices at this level of performance is an exciting challenge!”

TUK in Germany installs NEC LX Supercomputer with Intel Omni-Path

NEC Deutschland GmbH has delivered an LX series supercomputer to Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK), one of Germany’s leading Universities of Technology. “The new HPC cluster consists of 324 compute nodes totaling nearly 7,800 cores of the latest-generation Intel Skylake CPUs, and comprises a highly optimized Intel Omni-Path Interconnect architecture for low-latency, high-bandwidth communication. Additional GPGPU compute nodes equipped with the latest NVIDIA VOLTA 100 GPUs contribute to a total peak performance of the HPC cluster at approximately 700 Teraflops.”

Bright Computing adds support for OpenHPC

Today Bright Computing announced it has joined the Linux Foundation and will participate in the OpenHPC Community project. “Many of our HPC customers incorporate both commercial and open source management regimens on clusters based on Intel Xeon Scalable processors,” said Trish Damkroger, Vice President and General Manager, Technical Computing Initiative at Intel Corporation. “By supporting OpenHPC packages in their software, Bright Computing will help enable HPC practitioners assemble the ideal management framework for their needs.”

XSEDE offers free HPC Training from Cornell Virtual Workshop

Today Cornell University announced that four new Cornell Virtual Workshop training topics are available at the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) user portal. “The Cornell University Center for Advanced Computing (CAC) is a leader in the development and deployment of Web-based training programs designed to enhance the computational skills of researchers, broaden the participation of underrepresented groups in the sciences and engineering, and accelerate the adoption of new and emerging technologies.”